In your edition of March 20, your reader Greg Clemmer states that to cite Charles Stanley's Confederate military service is "politically correct." Well, if political correctness is what you wish to see, you need look no further than Article III of the federal Constitution, which describes levying war against the United States as a criminal act. That's what Charles Stanley did by joining the Confederate Army, regardless of his "heritage," his motives and the good works that he did later.

I personally wouldn't leave his name on a building so close to Emancipation Park. That issue aside, we should remember a man who chose treason, but not for his aid to those who wished to keep others in bondage. What ought to be remembered, in my view, is that Mr. Stanley and all the rest of us now live in land that pardoned those who made war on us, once they lay down their weapons and resumed their loyalty, however tarnished and bruised it may have been.

Charles Stanley, wherever he is now, should know that he was fortunate that he acted at the time and place that he did — history is short on examples of rebels who were allowed to go home en masse with their heads intact after their defeat.

Elden Carnahan

Laurel