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Woman in confrontation with police in Bel Air pleads guilty to disorderly conduct

Justice SystemBars and ClubsPeace Corps

A Davidsonville woman, who was videotaped in a physical and verbal confrontation with Bel Air Police officers outside Looney's Pub in Bel Air in March, took a plea before judgment for disorderly conduct and resisting arrest in Harford County District Court last week, according to court records.

In the video, which was posted on YouTube, Ariel Williams-Lewis, 23, woman is handcuffed by several officers standing over her. She is pulled to her feet and she and officers start to walk to the police car, when an officer stops and yells at her that if she spits on him again, he will "knock your [expletive] teeth out."

Williams-Lewis was charged March 6 with four counts of second-degree assault, resisting arrest, disorderly conduct, trespassing and failure to obey a lawful police order.

After she was taken to the Harford County Detention Center, she was additionally charged with second-degree assault and fourth-degree sexual assault after allegedly grabbing the private parts of an corrections office.

Appearing in court on May 5, Williams-Lewis was given one-year supervised probation before judgment with conditions to serve two weekends in jail, said Karen L. Jones, a Bel Air-based lawyer, who represented Williams-Lewis at the trial.

The defendant was given credit for one day severed because she was originally detained at the jail overnight following the arrest, Jones said.

Under her plea for probation for judgment, a conviction will not be entered into the deposition, said Jones, and Williams-Lewis can have the charges erased from her record after three years.

"I think probation before judgment was appropriate," Jones said. "She had no prior record and it appears that this was something out of character. She was over-served and highly intoxicated."

According to Jones, Williams-Lewis has aspirations to join the Peace Corps and has worked with underprivileged people in Thailand.

"I wasn't there, but I wonder why bars continue to over serve if someone is clearly over-intoxicated," Jones said.

A manager a Looney's Pub declined to comment Tuesday afternoon.

Harford County Assistant State's Attorney Alison Healey, who prosecuted the case, said she thinks the court gave Williams-Lewis an appropriate punishment based on the "very serious" nature of the case and defendant's background.

"Every case has to be treated on an individual basis and the court takes into consideration both the facts of the alleged incident ad the defendant that's involved," Healey said.

Copyright © 2014, The Baltimore Sun
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