The family was displaced and damage was estimated at $30,000.

Two days later, families in three homes on Pentwood Road in Bel Air were displaced after a major fire caused by improperly disposed coals from a charcoal grill.

A firefighter suffered minor injuries after falling from second floor of townhouse while working on the fire, which was reported early in the morning. A second firefighter was also treated for heat related illness.

An adjacent townhome was also destroyed in that blaze.


Sign up to receive our free daily email newsletter: Bel Air Today

Between July 20 and 24, three more fires damaged homes and injured people around the county.

In Bel Air, a fire in the 900 block of Hillswood Court was caused by a malfunctioning electric pedestal fan, the second fire in the community off Route 22 within a week.

A family was displaced and the fire caused $60,000 worth of damage to the townhouse, with smoke damage to houses on either side. Despite the 90-degree heat, however, no firefighters were treated for illness.

On July 22, a Bel Air firefighter suffered minor burns while responding to a nighttime fire in the 200 block of Marshall Drive in Forest Hill.

That fire started in a basement and was deemed to be caused by a lightning strike.

The firefighter was taken to Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, where he was treated and released.

The home sustained $250,000 in damage.

On July 24, a homeowner was taken to Bayview for minor burn to his face and smoke inhalation following a fast-moving fire in the 4300 block of Winners Circle in Belcamp.

He was expected to make a full recovery.

A firefighter was also treated on site for a minor eye injury. Several other residents were able to escape injury during the fire, which destroyed the home, valued at $500,000, and caused moderate heat-related damage to homes on each side.

The cause was determined to be accidental, originating in the garage.

"We take so much of what we do every day for granted and often times without thinking through the consequences," Hopkins said. "Sometimes, these unfortunate consequences catch up with us and the result is the fires we've seen recently. We hope our communities learn from these devastating fires and take steps to protect themselves so it doesn't happen to them."