This Friday, Nov. 8, in recognition of Native American Month, the Historical Society of Harford County will present the documentary film, "Dakota 38," the story of the Minnesota Sioux uprising of 1862 in reaction to mistreatment and starvation by United States government representatives.

"Dakota 38" examines the incidents that lead to the uprising and its tragic aftermath which culminated with hanging of thirty-eight Dakota men.

The film will be shown at Society headquarters, 143 N. Main Street in Bel Air at 7 p.m. Tickets are $8 per person, $6 for students and teachers (including retired teachers). Soft drinks and popcorn are included in the admission. Reservations are encouraged but tickets may be purchased at the door.

Producer Silas Hagerty brings the story full circle however, as he tells a tale of history and healing bringing the viewer modern day insights into the events of 1862 and their effect on the descendants of the thirty-eight Dakota men who were hanged as punishment for the uprising.

The primary focus of the 2009 film is the mid- December ride on horseback from South Dakota to Mankato, Minnesota by those descendants and which was timed to end at the site of and on the date of the December 26th hanging.

The evening will also feature the story of Joseph Renshaw Brown, originally of the Bethel/Jarrettsville area of Harford County.

Joseph R. Brown was an Indian trader, agent, inventor and newspaperman, whose home was one of those burned during the uprising.

"Dakota 38" is a powerful and thought provoking film which examines this incident from both the Dakota and white perspectives.

The documentary was brought to the attention of the Historical society while still in production. The film is made available courtesy of the producer and Smooth Feather Productions.