County exec Glassman says he plans to run for re-election

Barry Glassman seems to be trying to generate name recognition outside Harford County, but insists he intends to announce in October he will seek re-election as county executive.

On his way to the annual J. Millard Tawes Crab and Clam Bake in Crisfield, Md. Wednesday, Glassman tweeted a picture he snapped along the way of a pair of "Barry Glassman for Maryland" signs, with the comment "Look what we saw on the way to @CrisfieldMD Tawes."

The signs were in a field along Route 50 near Easton, on the farm of a fellow alumnus from Washington College, Glassman said.

Glassman, a Republican, called them his "state signs," named for their red, yellow and black colors of the Maryland flag, as opposed to his blue and green "county" signs, he said Thursday.

"It's a regional type sign we use just for name recognition," Glassman said.

Other politicians put up signs as well, he added. In addition to the signs on the way to the crab feast, he also also had signs at the event.

He's also used "Glassman for Maryland" signs at the annual Maryland Association of Counties conference in Ocean City and other fundraisers and events he's held and attended outside Harford County.

He does not plan on running for governor or another officer other than county executive in the 2018 election, he said.

"There are so many rumors out there. But I fully anticipate announcing for re-election in October at Level at my annual business breakfast," Glassman said.

The breakfast will be held Oct. 17 at Level Fire Hall, where he "always announces," he said.

Glassman, 55, was elected county executive in 2014. He has held elected office continually since 1990, when he was elected to the first of two four-year terms on the Harford County Council. He was then elected to three, four-year terms in the Maryland House of Delegates, leaving part-way through the third for an appointment to the State Senate, where he later was elected to a full term in 2010 prior to his successful bid for county executive.

He did briefly consider running for the open U.S. Senate seat in the 2016 election, but decided against it, saying early in that year, "Some dreams are fleeting; others meant to last a while. So I guess what I am trying to say is, I am not quite ready for this dream to be over."

As his county executive term has progressed, however, there has been speculation among many fellow Republicans in Harford and beyond that Glassman has his eye on eventually either running for governor or the U.S. House of Representatives.

The 2018 governor's race would appear to be out of the question, as popular Gov. Larry Hogan, a fellow Republican, has indicated he intends to seek a second term.

Meanwhile, the two congressional seats Harford shares with other counties, the First and Second districts, are held by well entrenched incumbents, Republican Andy Harris and Democrat C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger, respectively.

Glassman's Darlington home is in the First District (congressional candidates can run in any district in their state, regardless of where they live) which covers part of neighboring Baltimore County, part of Carroll County and all of Cecil County and the other eight Eastern Shore counties.

With regard to his signs, Glassman said he has supporters on the Eastern Shore and throughout Maryland.

"I am Harford County-centered, but I do get outside the county," he said. "My political roots to back to my days in Annapolis."

He's hoping to get his name out there in a bigger area, he said.

"It's not that I'm necessarily going to do anything," he said. "In this business, name recognition doesn't hurt. It's just getting my name out there in those areas."

While Glassman says he's running for reelection to his second term as county executive, he won't speculate beyond that.

The filing deadline for the 2018 elections is Feb. 27. The primary is June 26, 2018 and the general election is Nov. 6, 2018.

"I don't usually look past the next election, it's something I learned from Sen. Hooper," Glassman said, referring to the late Northern Harford legslator whom he succeeded in the State Senate. "I usually run hard for the thing I'm doing and worry about the next election down the road."

Aegis staff member Allan Vought contributed to this report.

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