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January 2013: Harford catches Ravens playoff fever

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The first baby born in Harford County in 2013 was Bel Air's Hanna Lyn Street, born at Upper Chesapeake Medical Center at 1:38 a.m. on Jan. 1. She was the first child of Nicole Smith and Camaron Street.

Four Havre de Grace men became the first same-sex couples legally married in Harford County. Maryland state law allowing such unions took effect on Jan. 1.

The Harlem Globetrotters performed in Harford County at the new APGFCU Arena.

The county's private fire and EMS association voted unanimously to support the latest draft of the county executive's order to create an emergency services department.

The oldest Episcopal parish in Maryland, St. George's Spesutia Church in Perryman, held its last service. The parish had been in operation since 1671 and in its building since 1851. A lack of income and low attendance were cited as reasons for the closure.

Snow fell in early January, but only enough to make the roads wet and a little slippery in some areas.

The Harford County Division of Emergency Operations was the second center in the world and first in the United States awarded its tri-reaccreditation from the International Academies of Emergency Dispatch in Salt Lake City. This accomplishment demonstrates that the Harford County Division of Emergency Operations is compliant with all international standards for emergency medical, fire and police dispatch.

A Ravens Rally was held at Armory Park on Main Street in Bel Air to celebrate the Ravens going to the AFC divisional playoff game against the Broncos in Denver on Jan. 13. The Ravens beat the Broncos and then faced the New England Patriots in the AFC Championship game, which they won 28-13. Next stop was the Super Bowl in New Orleans in February.

The Bel Air Board of Town Commissioners passed an ordinance to allow food trucks and other mobile vendors to operate within the Bel Air town limits.

The life of a C. Milton Wright High School girls basketball player was saved thanks to prompt action by coaches and police on the scene. The player stopped breathing and collapsed on the court. A Maryland State Police trooper at the scene utilized an AED and shocked the patient. Paramedics from the Bel Air Volunteer Fire Company arrived and continued life support and transported the victim to the Upper Chesapeake Medical Center. Her condition continued to improve as she was transported to the hospital, where she was listed in stable condition.

Marlin & Ray's restaurant in Bel Air closed after only being open for four months. The restaurant, just recently converted from a Ruby Tuesday's, was closed along with two other stores in Virginia and another in North Carolina.

The Harford County Council moved back into its former home in the "Black Box" on Bond Street in Bel Air. The building was closed in 201 because of structural damage.

Havre de Grace's answer to the Polar Bear Plunge, the "Duck Dunk," took place to raise money for the Susquehanna Hose Company. Participants would dunk themselves in the cold waters of the Chesapeake Bay for charity.

Hayward Putnum, long time "Outdoors in Harford County" columnist for The Aegis, died after a long illness.

Residents of the Richardson's Legacy development on Tollgate Road in Bel Air told members of the Harford County Development Advisory Committee that they didn't want their community of 42 homes connected to Magness Overlook, a much larger development of 224 homes. Plans for developing the Magness properties on both sides of Ring Factory Road had been approved for more than a year.

Gino's Burgers & Chicken opened its doors in Aberdeen at the corner of Beards Hill Road and West Bel Air Avenue.

The Bel Air town officials were presented with an opportunity to purchase a 177-year-old brick colonial home off of West Gordon Street. The home, originally built in 1835 by the Hays family, sits right on the town border next to the Liriodendron property. The home is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, but there is no historic easement protecting the structure from significant alteration or demolition.

Copyright © 2014, The Baltimore Sun
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