Reading about the Booths and Harford County

Reading about John Wilkes Booth and Harford County

There are a number of books and other writings available in Harford County on the life of John Wilkes Booth and the Booth family. Here are a few:

Books

"American Brutus," by Michael W. Kaufman, Random House, 2004, available from the Harford County Public Library.

"American Gothic," by Gene Smith, Simon and Schuster, 1992, Harford Community College Library.

"Blood on the Moon," the assassination of Abraham Lincoln, by Edward Steers Jr., The University Press of Kentucky, 2001, Harford County Public Library.

"Fortune's Fool," the life of John Wilkes Booth, by Terry Alford, Oxford University Press, 2015, Harford County Public Library.

"John Wilkes Booth," a sister's memoir by Asa Booth Clarke, edited by Terry Alford, University Press of Mississippi, 1996, Historical Society of Harford County.

"My Thoughts Be Bloody," by Nora Titone, Free Press, 2010, Harford County Public Library.

"Right or Wrong, God Judge Me," the writings of John Wilkes Booth, edited by John Rhodehamel and Louise Taper, Harford Community College Library and Historical Society of Harford County.

"Sketches of Tudor Hall and the Booth Family," by Ella V. Mahoney, 1925, self-published, Historical Society of Harford County.

"The Mad Booths of Maryland," by Stanley Kimmel, The Bobbs-Merrill Company, 1940, Historical Society of Harford County.

"The Man Who Killed Lincoln," by Philip Van Doren Stern, The Literary Guild of American, 1930, Historical Society of Harford County.

Pamphlets, manuscripts

"Edwin Booth Harford County's Prince of Players," parts 1 and 2, Harford Historical Bulletin, numbers 98 and 99, Summer 2004 and Fall 2004, Historical Society of Harford County.

"Joseph and Ann Hall: Behind the Scenes at Tudor Hall," Harford Historical Bulletin, number 104, Fall 2006, Historical Society of Harford County.

"The House that Booth Built (The House that Fell with Lincoln)," part 1, Ellen V. Mahoney and Helen Covey Milius, unpublished, Historical Society of Harford County.

"The House that Booth Built, a Revisit: Harford County's Tudor Hall," Harford Historical Bulletin, number 71, Winter 1997.

"Tudor Hall, Harford County, 1854, youthful letters reveal Booth was hard-drinking, carousing, wenching, drop-out juvenile delinquent, but sentiment could move Lincoln's assassin," Wayde Chrismer, 1964, Historical Society of Harford County.

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