Maryland Environment

  • A Maryland paper mill burns a polluting sludge called black liquor. The state calls it green energy.

    A Maryland paper mill burns a polluting sludge called black liquor. The state calls it green energy.

    The paper mill hulks over a bend in the Potomac River Valley, a castle of pale blue metal between steep green slopes. Clouds of steam billow from its towers. The Luke Mill, the largest employer in this tiny town, has powered the economy in this corner of Appalachia for generations, producing paper...

  • Environmentalists ask Exelon to pay for Conowingo sediment cleanup

    Environmentalists ask Exelon to pay for Conowingo sediment cleanup

    A group of environmentalists released a study Tuesday suggesting the owner of Conowingo Dam on the lower Susquehanna River can afford to help reduce or counteract the pollution that flows past the dam, harming Chesapeake Bay health. But the company, Chicago-based Exelon Corp., said the analysis...

  • Toxic algae bloom, unusual for this time of year, reported in Baltimore harbor

    Toxic algae bloom, unusual for this time of year, reported in Baltimore harbor

    A “mahogany tide” of algae, including one species known to cause fish kills, appeared in the Baltimore harbor this week. The algae bloom is an unusual occurrence at this time of year when waters are cool. Monitoring equipment showed an explosion of chlorophyll, the molecule plants use to turn sunlight...

  • Report: Patapsco wastewater plant far exceeding its pollution limit

    Report: Patapsco wastewater plant far exceeding its pollution limit

    Baltimore’s Patapsco Wastewater Treatment Plant released four times the amounts of nitrogen and phosphorus permitted in 2016, according to a new report by an environmental advocacy group. The plant, Maryland’s second-largest, was among 21 wastewater plants across the Chesapeake Bay watershed that...

  • Govans Presybterian Church launches storm water project

    Govans Presybterian Church launches storm water project

    Members of the Govans Presybterian Church followed a bagpipe player out of their stone sanctuary Sunday, then formed a semicircle around a tree on the edge of the church property whose time with the congregation was running short. On the ground lay seven shovels to break ground on a $100,000 stormwater...

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