While those in the education world are gearing up for a whirlwind of public education reforms this school year, the general public either don't know or disapprove of the most significant ones that will impact teachers and students here in Maryland, and across the nation.

According to an annual survey of the public's attitude toward education, two out of three people had never heard of the new Common Core Standards, which will overhaul curricula in more than 40 states this year. The vast majority of those who did know said they were "somewhat knowledgeable," about the most radical curriculum shift in recent history.

Additionally, the majority of people don't think that more standardized testing will help improve student performance, or that teachers should be evaluated based on how their students perform on the assessments.

The results come in a year that more states, including Maryland, will be rolling out new assessments and teacher evaluation systems that link job performance to test scores.

The poll, conducted by Gallup and Phi Delta Kappa International, has for 45 years measured the public's temperature on education, and explores a variety of topics including attitudes about charter schools, how well students are prepared for college and careers, pre-school options, school vouchers and trusting teachers and principals.

You can read the full poll results/report by clicking here.

erica.green@baltsun.com

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