Court documents say police kicked open door at Korryn Gaines' apartment

New court documents say police kicked open door at Korryn Gaines' apartment

A police officer kicked in the door and entered the Randallstown apartment of Korryn Gaines after getting a key from her landlord, according to court documents released Wednesday.

New details of the incident are contained in an arrest warrant for Gaines, 23, who was shot to death by a tactical officer Monday after an hours-long standoff. Police obtained the warrant — charging Gaines with first- and second-degree assault and other charges — after they said they saw Gaines point a shotgun at an officer on Monday morning.

Officers initially went to the home to serve warrants on Gaines and her boyfriend, Kareem Kiean Courtney, 39, in separate cases. According to the newly released court documents, two officers arrived at the Carriage Hill Apartments on Sulky Court about 9:10 a.m. to serve Gaines and Courtney with those warrants.

No one answered when the officers knocked and announced they were police, but they could hear someone cough inside, the documents state. An officer continued to knock for about 10 minutes.

"During that time further movement could be heard inside the location and a small child was heard crying," states the warrant, which was issued Monday. Two officers went to the rental office to ask for a key.

But after using the key, officers still could not open the door because of an interior chain lock, the warrant states. Officers could see a woman sitting on the floor and asked her to come to the door, but she refused.

One officer then "kicked the door forcing the door open" and another entered the apartment and saw the woman, later identified as Gaines, holding a shotgun, the warrant states. She pointed the shotgun at an officer and told them to leave, police wrote in the documents. The officer left and called for backup.

Police went to obtain the warrant for Gaines, which a court commissioner signed. It was issued at 12:43 p.m. Monday and charges her with first- and second-degree assault, obstructing and hindering, and resisting or interfering with arrest.

A police spokeswoman said officers followed the law when entering the apartment.

"Following a review of the entry, requested by Chief [James] Johnson, we have confirmed that the legal criteria for entering a home to serve an arrest warrant were satisfied," department spokeswoman Elise Armacost said in an email to The Baltimore Sun.

Gaines' 5-year-old son, Kodi, was in the apartment at the time and suffered a gunshot wound to his arm. Police say they have not yet determined whether he was shot by police or his mother.

alisonk@baltsun.com

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