For second time in a week, Baltimore police charge two teens as adults in a shooting

Baltimore Police on Monday charged two teenagers — aged 14 and 15 — as adults in a shooting and failed carjacking in the Franklin Square neighborhood of West Baltimore.

The announcement echoed another on Friday about similar charges against two other teens, aged 14 and 16, in a separate shooting and failed robbery in the Irvington neighborhood of Southwest Baltimore.

"It's sad to see these young kids, who look like babies, involved in these serious crimes," said T.J. Smith, a police spokesman. "They know right from wrong, but clearly, there is a larger problem when we speak of 14 year-olds charged with shooting someone."

In the Franklin Square incident March 11, police say Kevin Vaughan, 14, and Charles Cottman, 15, approached a 58-year-old man sitting in his car in the 1700 block of W. Baltimore Street and attempted to take his car.

"The victim struggled with the suspects and was shot in the shoulder," police said. Vaughan and Cottman then fled, police said.

Both have now been charged as adults with attempted murder, assault, robbery and gun charges, police said. They were being held without bail, and did not have attorneys listed in online court records. A preliminary hearing is scheduled Wednesday.

In the Irvington incident, which occurred Jan. 31, police say Antonio Washington, 14, and Tyler Richardson, 16, approached a 30-year-old man walking in the 3600 block of Wilkens Avenue and attempted to rob him, shooting him in the arm in the process.

They have now been charged as adults with attempted first degree murder, assault, robbery and gun charges, police said.

Washington is being held without bail. His attorney listed in online court records could not be reached Monday. Richardson also is being held without bail, and did not have an attorney listed in online court records. A preliminary hearing is scheduled Thursday.

Smith said such crimes speak to the need for more resources in violent neighborhoods, not just from police but from all of the city's agencies — which is what Mayor Catherine Pugh and Commissioner Kevin Davis recently called for in four "Transformation Zones" in the city.

"We cannot police our way out of issues like this," Smith said. "Sadly, we've seen too many incidents, this year alone, of juvenile offenders committing very serious crimes."

krector@baltsun.com

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