Who are the 7 Baltimore officers indicted?

The Baltimore Sun
Who are the seven Baltimore police officers indicted Wednesday?

These are the seven city officers charged with racketeering Wednesday by the U.S. attorney's office:

Detective Jemell Rayam

Detective Jemell Rayam, 36, was hired by the Baltimore Police Department in 2005.

According to news accounts, he shot three people while on duty within a 21-month period several years ago, prompting two state delegates and the local branch of the NAACP to call for an investigation.

Rayam and two other detectives were driving past an alley near the 2800 block of W. Garrison Ave. on March 6, 2009, when they stopped to question Shawn Corey Cannady, according to news accounts at the time. The officers said Cannady began to drive the car toward them, and Rayam fired once, striking the car, which crashed into a house. Cannady died two days later.

City officials agreed in 2013 to pay Cannady's family $100,000.

The other shootings, in June and October 2007, did not cause deaths, and the department deemed them justified. Rayam received a citation of valor for his role in one of those shootings.

Rayam lives in Owings Mills. He earns $71,000 a year. He made $30,800 in overtime last year.

Detective Dan Hersl

Detective Daniel Thomas Hersl, 47, was hired by the department in 1999.

The Baltimore Sun reported in 2014 that he was involved in three incidents that led to city settlements.

In 2010, Charles Faulkner accused Hersl of breaking his jaw and nose. Faulkner, who later received probation before judgment for drug charges, sued, and the city settled for $49,000.

In 2008, Taray Jefferson accused Hersl and another officer of breaking her arm while they searched for a drug suspect in a carryout. The city settled for $50,000.

In 2007, Lillian Parker was selling church raffle tickets when Hersl and Detective Calvin Moss accused her of selling drugs. She spent two days in jail, but prosecutors dropped charges against her. She sued in 2010, and the city settled for $100,000.

Hersl lives in Joppa. He earns $77,600 a year. He made $66,600 in overtime last year.

Sgt. Wayne Jenkins

Sgt. Wayne Earl Jenkins, 36, was hired by the department in 2003.

He was one of two officers named in a March 2014 incident in which police said he struck an armed suspect with his car.

Officers arrested the man and officers recovered a pistol, the department said at the time.

Jenkins was named in a settlement in 2008. City officials agreed to pay $75,000 to Timothy O'Conner of Bel Air after he said Jenkins struck him.

O'Conner was involved in an argument outside a bar in Southeast Baltimore in 2005 when officers responded. O'Conner allegedly cursed at one of the officers and said he was then struck by Jenkins.

Jenkins lives in Middle River. He earns $85,400 a year. He made $83,300 in overtime last year.

Detective Evodio Hendrix

Detective Evodio Calles Hendrix, 32, was hired by the department in 2009.

Hendrix lives in Randallstown. He earns $69,300 a year. He made $52,400 in overtime last year.

Detective Marcus Taylor

Detective Marcus Roosevelt Taylor, 30, was hired by the department in 2009.

Taylor lives in Glen Burnie. He earns $66,800 a year. He made $56,200 in overtime last year.

Detective Maurice Ward

Detective Maurice Kilpatrick Ward, 36, was hired by the department in 2003.

In May 2012, Ward was one of three officers involved in the alleged battery and false arrest of Tiyon Williams, according to an account provided to the city's Board of Estimates.

Williams said he was talking with a friend in the 900 block of N. Mount St. when officers approached them and Williams ran. Ward allegedly chased and tackled him, according to a summary given to the Board of Estimates. Williams said he followed the officer's commands, but was dragged and beaten before being placed in handcuffs. Police later determined he had committed no crime.

Williams sued, and city officials agreed last year to pay him $150,000.

Ward lives in Middle River. He earns $72,700 a year. He made $62,500 in overtime last year.

Detective Momodu Gondo

Detective Momodu Bondeva Kenton Gondo, 34, was hired by the department in 2005.

Gondo was 23 and two months out of the police academy in 2006 when he was shot three times in the back while off duty during an armed carjacking outside his home in the city.

Gondo had arrived at his home in the 5700 block of The Alameda on Dec. 5, 2006, when he was approached by a gunman, police said. Gondo struggled with the gunman before he managed to pull out his semiautomatic service weapon and shoot him.

Police charged Collin Hawkins in the shooting. During the trial, the only evidence presented was Gondo's identification of his alleged assailant in a photo array. The jury acquitted Hawkins. He was later sentenced to 30 years in federal prison in a November 2006 carjacking.

Gondo lives in Owings Mills. He earns $71,400. He made $29,100 in overtime last year.

—Jessica Anderson, Kevin Rector and Justin Fenton

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