Congressional caseworker Jessica Gatton Facini has helped save the homes of dozens of Baltimore residents from foreclosure.

Congressional caseworker Jessica Gatton Facini has helped save the homes of dozens of Baltimore residents from foreclosure. (Jed Kirschbaum, Baltimore Sun / August 17, 2011)

Inside a small cubicle in Timonium, Jessica Gatton Facini is saving homes.

The 26-year-old sorts through foreclosure and lien documents from Baltimore homeowners, identifies a problem and then navigates the bureaucracy of big banks and government agencies in search of a solution.

It's a challenging task — some homeowners would say impossible — but Facini wields a weapon most Marylanders do not.

When she contacts a bank, her caller I.D. says "U.S. Congress."

As part of a little-known effort, congressional staffers across the country have been calling banks relentlessly to bargain for help for homeowners. In response, some of the country's biggest financial entities, such as Wells Fargo and Bank of America, have even set up special lines to field the congressional staffer members' calls.

Often, Facini says, she can negotiate a way for a homeowner to stay in his or her home. But sometimes there's nothing that can be done.

"I essentially serve as the middleman," she says. "A lot of foreclosures happen because someone lost a job or have debts as part of a medical condition. There are some we can't help, and it's heartbreaking."

Since the subprime mortgage crisis took down the U.S. housing market — and rocked the nation's economy as a whole — Congress has ramped up efforts to stem the tide of foreclosures.

Foreclosures depress property values. In Baltimore, vacant homes mean the spread of blight and crime.

Mortgage firms have foreclosed on more than 50,000 homes in Maryland since the final peak days of the housing bubble in January 2006, according to real estate data firm CoreLogic. That's about 23 homes per day. More than 20,000 of those completed foreclosures — 40 percent — were on homes in the Baltimore metro area.

Meanwhile, the state has the second-highest rate of borrowers who are behind on their mortgage payments by 90 days or more and not yet in foreclosure, at 4.7 percent, according to the Mortgage Bankers Association.

Facini works for U.S. Rep. C. A. Dutch Ruppersberger, one of several Maryland congressmen who meet with area residents about preventing foreclosures. Sometimes hundreds of people pack the rooms, looking for advice.

"With this terrible economy, people that need help, they don't know where to go," Ruppersberger says. "They're calling us because they need help."

Facini says she has worked on nearly 600 cases personally. Rep. Elijah Cummings' office, which coverages a larger swath of Baltimore, has averaged about 2,000 foreclosure cases a year since 2009.

Even with special lines approved for congressional workers, Facini says, she still faces the same frustrations that homeowners do when the tries to deal with some large institutions. She spends much of her time on hold, listening to elevator music.

"Jessica is a master in getting things done," Ruppersberger says. "She's tenacious."

One of those Facini helped is Dorothy Artis, a 63-year-old former teacher who nearly lost her house over an unpaid water bill.

A resident of Northeast Baltimore, Artis attended one of Ruppersberger's foreclosure workshops and later explained her problems to the congressional staffers.

She was laid off from her job with Prince George's County schools in 2008. Her daughter also lost her job and moved in to Artis' Northeast Baltimore home with her son.