Councilman David Marks

Councilman David Marks announced his re-election campaign before a crowd of dozens in the Idlewylde Community Hall Wednesday in Towson. (Photo by Jon Meoli / October 9, 2013)

Before a crowd of dozens in the most Democratic precinct in Baltimore County’s 5th District, Councilman David Marks, a Republican from Perry Hall, announced Wednesday that he was running for re-election.

“I want to help guide downtown Towson through the growth that we all know is coming,” Marks said. “We need to thoughtfully grow, and we have to have good planning now so Towson is a model for sustainability and mobility.

Marks announced his re-election campaign at a pair of events Wednesday, the first in Carney for his constituents in northeast Baltimore County and the second at the Idlewylde Community Hall in Towson. He is the third sitting council member to file for re-election, joining 3rd District Councilman Todd Huff and 4th District Councilman Ken Oliver.

In his remarks at the event, Marks highlighted his accomplishments all across the Towson area, from securing funds for school construction projects at Hampton Elementary, Stoneleigh Elementary, and Dumbarton Middle, to his efforts to pave more than 12 miles of Towson-area roads.

A group Towson residents—former Idlewylde Community Association President Tom Lattanzi, Rodgers Forge Community Association President Stu Sirota, and Idlewylde parent Aimee Freeman—introduced Marks at the event.

Sirota, a professional urban planner, lauded Marks’ efforts to ensure Towson can handle its coming development boom.

“It’s impossible to ignore the progress that’s being made now in downtown Towson—more than $500 million in private investment, which is starting to transform the whole commercial core,” Sirota said. “But David Marks has also recognized that we need to have measures in place to plan for this growth. He’s the one saying we need to slow down and look at the big picture.”

Freeman, who was one of many Stoneleigh Elementary School parents who worked with Marks to help secure 200-seat addition that opened this year, spoke highly of Marks’ concentration on Towson’s schools.

“When he was elected, there was concern about how a councilman who lives in Perry Hall could really represent those of us in Towson,” Freeman said. “But I think David has truly surpassed all expectations.”