Police warn residents to beware of strangers rummaging through mail

The Baltimore County Police Department's Towson precinct commander is advising residents to be on the lookout for strangers rummaging through their mail looking for fraudulently obtained driver's licenses.

The strangers are looking for licenses under names other than the resident's, said Capt. Jay Landsman Jr., the commander of Precinct 6, who issued the alert by email to community associations in Towson Thursday.

The Maryland Motor Vehicle Administration has received complaints of people who have applied for state driver's licenses under addresses that do not belong to them, according to Landsman. The applicants are retrieving the licenses from the mail once the MVA has sent the licenses to the addresses.

"These individuals have no connection to the families at the addresses which were used," Landsman wrote. "They have falsely used these addresses because they are not Maryland residents and they cannot obtain licenses in their home state."

While the activity has been recently reported in Wiltondale, Landsman warned that it can happen anywhere in the county.

Police recently have taken 10 reports of people receiving licenses bearing unfamiliar names that were sent to addresses on four Wiltondale streets, including Aintree, Sussex, Worcester and Yarmouth Roads, Baltimore County Police spokeswoman Natalie Litofsky said.

"It seems to be isolated to that community, but if you open up your mailbox and find any MVA documentation that doesn't belong to your address, you should report that to the police," Litofsky said. "That's going to help them know what areas this is happening in."

Anyone who receives mail from the MVA addressed to an unknown individual is asked to report the incident to police by calling 911 or 410-887-2222 and to contact the MVA duty desk at 410-768-7541 to arrange a meeting with an MVA investigator.

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