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Sandy befalls Anneslie neighbors with similar fates

In terms of widespread damage or power outages, the remnants of Superstorm Sandy brought significantly less damage to the Towson area than some previous storms.

But in a small pocket of Anneslie, the southeast Towson neighborhood with the most significant power outages in Sandy's wake, the differences in damage between communities, blocks and even houses was brought to the forefront by the storm, which by late Monday was being referred to as a post-tropical storm.

Late Monday evening, a tree fell from a neighbor's yard onto the roof of Chris and Jeannette Ramer's house on Murdock Road.

"It felt like an earthquake," said Chris Ramer, 64.

Although utility lines run behind Ramer's house, the fallen tree only took out his cable. Because of the high roof on his house, Ramer said the tree didn't gain much momentum on the way down and might not have caused much damage other than to his slate roof tiles and gutters.

Ramer didn't lose power until a second tree — which sat right next to the first and which appeared to have an intertwining root system with the fallen tree — fell.

The second tree came down around 1:30 a.m. Tuesday, taking down power lines before it landed on the Regester Avenue home of Mike Phillips, 65.

That tree ultimately snapped the utility pole in Ramer's backyard, which sits at the end of Murdock Road. Phillips said his family room, where the tree landed, was ruined by the ceiling and roof damage, causing water to pour down the walls.

Phillips said he had several trees in his yard removed last summer to protect against storms, including one that could have been directly in the path of the one that fell on his home.

"We took them all down for this purpose — then the neighbor's end up falling," Phillips said.

That neighbor, Lois Sansone, said he felt the trees come down, but didn't lose power from either of them until Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. came to shut off the downed lines late Tuesday morning.

Last year, Sansone said a neighbor's tree fell into her yard, and that the neighborly relations on her street were such that the damage could be taken care of amicably.

"I believe so," she said with a smile.

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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