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Sydnor wins District 44B, with second delegate's seat too close to call

ElectionsPolitical FundraisingTom QuirkKevin Kamenetz

With all 18 of the district's precincts reporting, results in the District 44B race for state delegate showed one clear winner in the Democratic primary — Catonsville area resident Charles Sydnor, who received 23.54 percent of the vote.

Pat Young, of Catonsville, was second, according to Baltimore County Board of Elections results.

But Young cautioned that it was too close to call until absentee ballots are counted.

Young received 49 more votes than Barnett, who resides in Woodlawn.

With such a close race, Young said he's not ready to declare a win just yet.  

"We're going to keep watching the numbers and will wait," Young said Wednesday morning, just after the unofficial votes were reported. "[Barnett] and I are going to wait for the absentee ballots to be counted on Thursday, June 26."

Young received 22.91 percent of the vote; Aaron J. Barnett, 22.83 percent; Rainier Harvey, 17.93 percent; Barry "Bishop Barry" Chapman, 9.54 percent; and Frederick Ware-Newsome, 3.35 percent. 

Michael J. Russell, who ran uncontested in the Republican primary, received 957 votes.  

There were a few surprises in the close Democratic race, with six candidates vying for the two open seats in the newly redrawn district that includes parts of Catonsville and Woodlawn that previously belonged to District 10.  

First District Councilman Tom Quirk, who endorsed Harvey and Sydnor, said, "44B was a surprise. I look forward to seeing who wins.

"I give a lot of credit to Pat Young. It's clear he did a lot of door knocking, without a doubt," Quirk said.

As a member of the Baltimore County Planning Board with experience working as political director for Del. Adrienne Jones (District 10) and a number of endorsements including those from Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz,  Del. Adrienne Jones (District 10) and Del. Shirley Nathan-Pulliam (District 10), Harvey had the backing of his party's establishment.

He was seen by many as a front runner in the race.

"A lot of people did consider me the front runner, and as you can see, you just can't predict what the voters are going to do," he said. "I ran a good race and the voters have decided who they want their delegates to be.

"The voters have spoken and it appears that they have selected Charles Sydnor and Pat Young," Harvey said. "And I think that they are both quality individuals and will represent residents well in Annapolis."

The latest campaign finance reports filed by candidates showed Barnett with a balance of $17,524.90, Harvey with $16,855.01, Sydnor with $13,716.25 and Young with $10,830.87.

"I know Rainier spent hundreds of hours working on his campaign and he's a good guy. It's got to be pretty hard to spend all that time and not come out on top," Quirk said.

"I do feel for all of those candidates who don't come out on top," said Quirk, who won his first race to represent the 1st district on the Baltimore County Council in 2010. "It's very personal, running a campaign.  I definitely wish them all the best and thank them for their service to the community."

Russell will face Sydnor and the other Democratic winner in the Nov. 4 general election.

Copyright © 2014, The Baltimore Sun
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ElectionsPolitical FundraisingTom QuirkKevin Kamenetz
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