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News Maryland Baltimore County Arbutus Lansdowne

Volunteers to clean up Edmondson Heights Park Saturday

A team of volunteers will be tackling trash as part of a stream cleanup in Edmondson Heights Park on Saturday, April 5.

The event is one of many across the state being held this spring to clean up tributaries of the Chesapeake Bay as part of Project Clean Stream, an effort organized by nonprofit Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay.

It will be the fourth annual cleanup of the park.

"It's just our way of educating people in the community about the trash that floats around and where it ends up," said Nancy Stevens, a Project Clean Stream coordinator.

"Our park is a lovely, beautiful green space and we want to keep it clean," Stevens said.

The park is bordered by Granville Road, North Forest Park Avenue and Harwall Road.

Last year, volunteers pulled out 54 bags of trash as well as larger, discarded items such as discarded bicycles from the stream, Stevens said.

Between 20 and 25 volunteers showed up to the last year's cleanup and Stevens is hoping that more volunteers will lend a hand this year.

"Everybody in our community is always fussing about the trash," said Stevens, an Edmondson Heights community resident who is organizing a stream cleanup in the neighborhood.

"We get more volunteers each year," Stevens said. "As long as we have people coming out it's really wonderful."

"We're going in with our gloves and bags, and we're ready to pull out trash," Stevens said.

Stevens is looking for volunteers and recommends that people wear old clothing, boots and layer up to keep warm.

The cleanup will be held from 9 a.m. to noon at the park. Students will have the opportunity to earn three community service hours.

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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