Baltimore police have charged a man in a triple shooting that killed two brothers in Southwest Baltimore, a crime that investigators believe led to the retaliatory killing of the mother and brother of one of the suspects.

But any celebration over closing a case that police feared would led to further reprisals was muted, as gun violence in the city continued to take its toll with the unrelated shooting Sunday night of a 9-year-old boy in Druid Heights.

Police said the unidentified boy was struck in the hip and critically wounded about 11 p.m. in the 400 block of Bloom St. Two men in their 20s, who police said were "well-known to law enforcement," were also struck and appeared to be the intended victims. Officers found the boy sitting with his mother, bleeding from the stomach.

"Bullets don't have names, and bullets can miss the intended target and wind up hitting an innocent person," said City Councilman Nick Mosby, whose district includes the area where the shooting took place. "You hate to see something like this happen."

In the Southwest Baltimore case, police announced that Tyrell Martin Hill, 27, also known as "Buck," had been charged in the Aug. 15 fatal shooting of brothers Troy, 33, and Euclides Manley, 35. Hill has been in custody since last week as detectives worked to build a case against him, records show.

Police said they were continuing to investigate and expected to file charges against another suspect.

The shooting occurred in the 600 block of Linnard St., in the city's Edgewood neighborhood. About 9:15 p.m., police received a call for a shooting at the residence, and witnesses said they saw two men running away toward Edmondson Avenue. But police canvassed the area and knocked on Euclides Manley's door, and said they found nothing.

About 12:20 a.m., police received an anonymous call that there was someone shot inside the home. The caller refused to provide additional information and hung up. This time, medics and police responded, finding 19-year-old Elease Frazier critically wounded and later discovering the Manley brothers in a second-floor bedroom, records show.

Detectives said the bedroom had been "ransacked." Taken from the residence were "thousands of dollars, jewelry, and several grams of heroin in powder form," police wrote in charging documents, though it is unclear how police knew what had been taken.

Police viewed Hill as a suspect, and officers learned that he had been arrested minutes after the original call. Officers were driving in the 3400 block of Edmondson Ave., about two blocks from Linnard St., when they said Hill darted in front of their vehicle, causing them to slam on their brakes to avoid hitting him.

The officers chased and detained Hill, and during a search found 9 grams of suspected heroin and $322 in cash in his pockets. Hill also was carrying what was later discovered to be Troy Manley's cellphone, police said.

Across the city, and hours after a candlelight vigil for the Manley brothers the next night, gunmen ambushed and killed the mother and brother of one of the suspects in the triple shooting, police said. The killings occurred outside a home in the 4200 block of Hamilton Ave. in the Frankford neighborhood of Northeast Baltimore. The victims were identified as Diane Edwards, 54, and Robert Hardy, 33.

It is unclear whether they were related to Hill or the second suspect.

The spasm of violence had police bracing for more, and acting Police Commissioner Anthony Barksdale assembled a task force of top-performing detectives to investigate the case. Police officials said Monday that they were not aware of any subsequent retaliatory violence.

Anthony Guglielmi, the chief spokesman for the Police Department, said police were pleading for the public's help to solve the other recent shootings. He called the shooting of the 9-year-old boy particularly "egregious."

"We're hoping that the community will be cooperative in the investigation so we can put the people behind bars," he said.

jfenton@baltsun.com


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