After days of denial that he sent lewd photos of himself over the internet, followed by last week's forced admission that he was the source behind the images, Congressman Anthony Weiner stepped down.

"It's good because he doesn't represent the values of the United States," said John Ligon, a New Orleans resident.

Iola Harness, a New Orleans voter, agrees. "I really and truly believe that he should resign because of what's going on with politics and the things that are happening with the young kids now and it's not something that they should see and hear."

But this latest sex scandal is drawing comparisons to Louisiana Senator David Vitter. Vitter managed to retain his seat and was re-elected by a wide margin despite his involvement with prostitutes.

"He should have resigned also," said Harness.

"If we are going to force him (Weiner) to resign, I think Vitter could have as well," says Voter Darryl Phoenix.

But Ligon disagrees.

"I think there's a little bit of a difference between finding a telephone number in an address book and a guy sending those kind of pictures over the internet," Ligon said.

Political Analyst Jeff Crouere says Vitter's case is different because his fellow republicans closed ranks.

"The party didn't call for him to resign," Crouere said. "In fact, he went into the senate and they supported him."

But judging from the recent resignations of scandal-plagued politicians, those days of unwavering support have come to an end.

'"There's sort of a new standard that I think is now being employed that these sort of incidents can't be tolerated and they're an embarrassment to the party," said Crouere. "Republicans might now resent what happened with Vitter because now his name is mentioned constantly as someone who survived."

And continues to thrive because of supporters like Ligon.

"I voted for him, and I'll vote for him again," Ligon said.