Johnny Hallyday

Johnny Hallyday (Getty Images)

LOS ANGELES -- French rock legend Johnny Hallyday has emerged from a medically induced coma he had been in since last week, according to his press relations office.

Hallyday, 66, underwent surgery overnight Wednesday to Thursday at L.A.'s Cedars Sinai hospital to fix lingering back trouble from a Nov. 26 operation in Paris for a herniated disk.

After Hallyday woke from surgery at Cedars Sinai the doctors preferred putting him in an artificial coma to prevent him from suffering and getting tired, and thus to make the treatment easier, Hallyday's Web site said.

Hallyday producer Jean-Claude Camus said the American medical team treating Hallyday said the rocker had suffered ill-effects from the operation in France, and that an infection was attacking his bone marrow.

"It seems the Americans fixed things that they found that were very badly done," Camus said on French radio.

Meantime, police in Paris Saturday were investigating an alleged attack on Dr. Stephane Delajoux, the French surgeon who first operated on Hallyday, as he left a friend's home overnight.

Delajoux said one masked man attacked him, while another kept watch. The doctor had facial bruises and was checked out at a hospital Saturday, officials said.

Delajoux's lawyer issued a statement Friday saying the doctor was "outraged" by the allegations against him and that his surgery had "taken place perfectly."

As for the alleged attack on Delajoux, his lawyer criticized a "manhunt" against the doctor, but stopped short of making any claim that the attack and the allegedly botched surgery were connected.

Hallyday had been on a multi-city tour of France called "Route 66," a reference to his age and an homage to the American rock that inspired his music.

The tour is billed as his last.