A Prairie High School senior who is a registered sex offender in Battle Ground, Wash., pleaded not guilty Friday to raping a 14-year-old girl from his school. The case raised questions about the state's sex offender notification laws.

Jeremiah Thompson, 19, who was arrested April 12, pleaded not guilty in Clark County Superior Court to a charge of third-degree rape of a child.

He allegedly met the the 14-year-old freshman girl at a grocery store near the school before taking her to his home. Police said the girl told deputies the two went to Thompson’s home and had sex. The age of consent in the state, however, is 16. And police said the girl requested a rape kit afterward.

Clark County Superior Court Judge Diane Woolard set a tentative trial date of June 11.

Thompson is a level-two registered sex offender who, up until the April 12 arrest, was not in violation of his status.

When Jeremiah Thompson enrolled at Prairie High, the sheriff's office notified the school that he was a registered sex offender. But the school was not required to notify parents. Now parents are upset to find out after his arrest.

"I would have liked to have known just to give my own kids a heads-up," one mother said. 

"If parents had resources for this information without having to dig for it, then maybe nothing would have happened," said another.

Battle Ground School District spokesman said what Thompson is accused of doing happened off campus.

In February 2010, Thompson was convicted of communicating with a minor for immoral purposes and fourth-degree assault, which led to his sex offender status.

The school was aware of Thompson's sex offender status, authorities said, but state law doesn't allow officials to notify other students or parents.

Gregg Herrington, a spokesman for the Battle Ground School District, said, “We were aware of this student's background, very much, and there was monitoring and so forth that went on.

“Part of the restrictions in Washington are to protect the student who's the offender from harassment, maybe violence. We have to let them back into school, that's part of the law, too.”

State Rep. Kirk Pearson, R-Monroe, he has been trying to change the law for years to require schools to notify parents if a sex offender enrolls in their child’s school. But there have been concerns about privacy issues, and the potential for the possible bullying of kids who may be trying to get their lives back on track.

The state Department of Corrections testified against Pearson's bill, saying the state already has some of the toughest notification rules in the country.

“As long as we don't have stronger legislation in place, definitely it's going to happen again, like it happened a couple of years ago in Seattle at Roosevelt,” Pearson said.

In 2010, Roosevelt High senior Jose Reyes, a convicted sex offender, pleaded guilty to sexually assaulting a developmentally disabled 14-year-old girl.