Police call him a criminal. Others call him a hero.

The legend of the so-called "Barefoot Bandit" is growing... gaining national attention on CNN and FOX News.

The Colton Harris-Moore fan club on Facebook has over 2300 members and growing, with people actively cheering him on, and even offering him places to hide.

At Ballard's Good Time T- shirts, sales of Colton Harris-Moore Fan Club shirts are suddenly booming. "I am starting to get a lot of emails and phone calls", says Adin Stevens, the shop's owner.

He uses the phrase 'Momma Tried' on the shirts, from the Waylon Jennings outlaw song. Adin created the shirt, he says, because he just thought it was kinda funny.

"There are victims, but they are not victims of violent crime, some stuff has been stolen," Stevens says.

Some of that stuff belonged to Seattle radio personality Bob Rivers.

"People are admiring him on the internet. That's kinda goofy to me. I don't buy this cult hero stuff", Rivers says.

Rivers' small plane was stolen and crashed. And police say DNA evidence points to Harris-Moore as the culprit. "The plane was stolen and crashed without a trace, except for some lunch that was left in the plane. You know what I mean by 'lunch', right?" Rivers asks, pointing to his mouth and gagging.

Rivers says that he's been told that Harris-Moore used stolen credit card information to take flying lessons online, which furthers his legacy in the minds of some.

Local attorney and former prosecutor Chris davis says the glorification of such criminal behavior can be a very dangerous thing.

"You've got other kids who see this conduct as something cool, something praiseworthy, something that should be copied."

The media attention also intensifies the spotlight that is already on him. Harris-Moore's mother, and victims like Bob Rivers, say it is time for him to do the right thing and turn himself in to police.