No jobs and no money left for basic everyday needs -- problems a lot of Americans are dealing with in these tough economic times.

That includes a family of five in New Jersey, who are now sharing just a single bedroom in their neighbor's house.

One room is now home to a family of five. 

Two girls sleep on the bottom of a bunk bed, while one boy sleeps on the top. Mom and dad somehow manage to sleep together on the couch.

Adam and Talia Mobley brought in more than $100,000 two years ago, making them by all measures middle class, until they were both laid off. 

Frightening new numbers show 50 percent of the unemployed in New Jersey have been out of work for more than six months, and it's a similar story elsewhere.

Checks have run out and the Mobley’s have exhausted their savings. Human services of Morris County, New Jersey where the Mobley’s live has seen their food stamp case load surge 140 percent since 2007. 

This is one of the wealthiest counties in America, where the median household brings in over $91,000 a year. But when you can't find a job here, you can't get by. 

Despite sending out 500 resumes, nobody has offered Talia a job.

Afternoons are spent at grandma's with their three kids. Then it's back to Laura Sullivan’s house, where they're living rent free. Sullivan took them in after knowing the Mobley’s less than a year.

"People ask, why would you take someone in and you have no privacy,” says Sullivan.

“I'm like, 'honestly?  You want to compare my privacy to a family not having a home? Like is there any comparison?'"

It's far from ideal, but when you've been out of work this long, there's no room for ideal.