Sun Special Report: Maryland's troubled group homes

Coverage of the fallout after a special report by The Sun.

Sun series: Maryland's troubled group homes

A Sun investigation of state oversight of group homes going back a decade  Read more ...

Judge backs state on license denial

The state Department of Human Resources' plan to deny Evershine Residential Services a license to care for troubled youths has been backed by an administrative law judge who said the firm had violated numerous state regulations.  Read more ...

Sun investigation: A follow-up

State to close chain of group homes for youths

Maryland officials announced yesterday that they would shut down children's group homes run by a company whose executive director expensed Caribbean cruises, luxury SUVs and meals while residents endured what they and former staff described as inadequate medical attention and other mistreatment.  Read more ...

Neighbors describe their daily fears about group home residents

Until the group home moved into her southeastern Baltimore County neighborhood, Dot Horrocks had never felt so afraid. Teenage boys living in the privately run facility have, she said, peeked into her window and exposed themselves from the group home.  Read more ...

Administration opposes merging oversight of group homes

Ehrlich administration officials rejected yesterday a reform proposal to merge the scattered oversight of privately run group homes into a single agency, arguing that it is better to maintain the current regulatory structure.  Read more ...

Group-home oversight a 'disaster,' senators say

Lawmakers assailed the state's oversight of privately run group homes for troubled youths yesterday as a "disaster" and called on Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. to work with them to improve monitoring of care, spending and staffing at the facilities.  Read more ...

Legislators favor single agency to oversee Md. group homes

Oversight of privately run group homes for Maryland's troubled children, a responsibility now divided among several state agencies, should be consolidated, a growing number of lawmakers say.  Read more ...

Group-home executive resigns his post

A group-home company executive who expensed Caribbean cruises, luxury SUVs and the settlement of a sexual harassment complaint while making a salary of more than $135,000 has resigned, the company's lawyer said yesterday.  Read more ...

DHR official resigns post

Elisha B. Pulivarti, an official at the state Department of Human Resources with close ties to a group home company regulated by the agency, has resigned.  Read more ...

Child advocates urge probe of state official's ties to group home to go further

Child advocates yesterday called for an investigation into whether the state Department of Human Resources' oversight of a group home company was compromised by the relationship between an agency official and the company.  Read more ...

Md. official on board of company regulated by his department

An official at the state Department of Human Resources has close ties to a company that is regulated by the department and receives millions of dollars from it to operate group homes.  Read more ...

Md.'s troubled group homes

Group-home firm's director going on leave

The executive director of a group-home company who expensed Caribbean cruises, luxury SUVs and meals while making $135,275 in salary is being placed on leave while the board of directors investigates the business practices, his deputy and a board member said yesterday.  Read more ...

Hearings planned on group homes

Concerned about the care, spending and staffing in state-licensed children's group homes, lawmakers plan to hold hearings beginning next month on making "significant" changes to the regulation of the privately run facilities.  Read more ...

Sun Q&A on group homes

Clifford Collins, Randallstown: Have you analyzed the negative impact of group homes on local public schools? Most public schools in the Randallstown and Woodlawn areas do not have the resources to adequately serve agency-based students with special needs.  Read more ...

Md.'s troubled group homes

Leaders vow to fix Md. group homes

Assailing Maryland's lax oversight of children's group homes, legislative leaders pledged yesterday to investigate and make major improvements, with some saying there needs to be an overhaul of the entire child welfare system.  Read more ...

Md.'s troubled group homes

Reforms proposed, then put on the shelf

More than three years ago, Maryland was handed a blueprint to improve the care of nearly 3,000 children in privately run group homes.  Read more ...

For troubled teens, 'a second home'

BOONSBORO - She points proudly to a new report card marked with A's and B's and talks about a future career in law enforcement. Then she acknowledges that she'd be a high school dropout abusing drugs if she hadn't been sent five months earlier to the San Mar Children's Home here.  Read more ...

Md.'s Troubled Group Homes

Regulation of staff at homes is lacking

Group homes for children can employ almost anyone -- even convicted criminals.  Read more ...

Md.'s Troubled Group Homes

The word gets out early: 'Licensing is coming'

During his 15 months managing four group homes run by Evershine Residential Services Inc., Dennis Waters saw inspectors from the Department of Human Resources visit once. "We knew they were coming," he said. "It wasn't a surprise."  Read more ...

Maryland's Troubled Group Homes

State's lax oversight puts fragile children at risk

There were warning signs in the months before 11-year-old Arthur Lee Wiley became deathly ill.  Read more ...

Divided authority leads to murky responsibility

Maryland's oversight of group homes for children is complicated by the numerous agencies that play roles - some overlapping. One result is poor communication among offices, according to interviews and a review of licensing and monitoring records.  Read more ...

About the series

In an investigation of state oversight of group homes going back a decade, The Sun found that:  Read more ...

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