Global Jewish Day of Learning

Shelley Goldberg, of Hellertown,  studies a page of Talmud, during the Project Yachad Global Day of Jewish Learning at the Allentown Jewish Community Center on Sunday. The local event was sponsored by The Jewish Federation of the Lehigh Valley.  The Talmud is a central text of Judaism, containing rabbinic discussions pertaining to Jewish law, ethics, philosophy, customs and history. The Talmud has two components: the Mishnah (circa. 200 AD), the primary pillar of Judaism's Oral Law; and the Gemara (500 AD), a record of oral discussions of the Mishnah and the world of Jewish life. Over 300 communities from around the world participated in the event, which was held to coincide with the completion of five decades of work translating the Talmud by Rabbi Adin Steinsaltz, of Jersualem, Israel. In 1965, he began his monumental Hebrew translation and commentary on the Talmud. To date, he has published 43 of the anticipated 45 volumes. Among the activities at the Jewish Community Center on November 7, 2010, were story telling, talmud study groups, teen and adult learning, and a special presentation by Rabbi Judith Z. Abrams, of Houston, Texas.
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( Harry Fisher / The Morning Call / November 7, 2010 )

Shelley Goldberg, of Hellertown, studies a page of Talmud, during the Project Yachad Global Day of Jewish Learning at the Allentown Jewish Community Center on Sunday. The local event was sponsored by The Jewish Federation of the Lehigh Valley. The Talmud is a central text of Judaism, containing rabbinic discussions pertaining to Jewish law, ethics, philosophy, customs and history. The Talmud has two components: the Mishnah (circa. 200 AD), the primary pillar of Judaism's Oral Law; and the Gemara (500 AD), a record of oral discussions of the Mishnah and the world of Jewish life. Over 300 communities from around the world participated in the event, which was held to coincide with the completion of five decades of work translating the Talmud by Rabbi Adin Steinsaltz, of Jersualem, Israel. In 1965, he began his monumental Hebrew translation and commentary on the Talmud. To date, he has published 43 of the anticipated 45 volumes. Among the activities at the Jewish Community Center on November 7, 2010, were story telling, talmud study groups, teen and adult learning, and a special presentation by Rabbi Judith Z. Abrams, of Houston, Texas.

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