Elizabeth Taylor and Montgomery Clift

<b>Elizabeth Taylor and Montgomery Clift; Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton</b><br>
<br>
Taylor and Clift are not only breathtakingly beautiful in their first film together as the ill-fated lovers in the 1951 classic "A Place in the Sun," their loves scenes -- especially their first kiss -- will still make your knees tremble. The two teamed up six years later in the long Civil War epic, "Raintree County," for which Taylor received her first lead actress Oscar nomination. Clift, though, suffered  severe facial injuries in a car crash while the film was in production that changed his appearance and affected his performance. In 1959, they teamed up for the final time in the Tennessee Williams' surreal excursion into madness, "Suddenly, Last Summer." But Clift, who was battling booze and other demons, is difficult to watch. Taylor wanted him to star with her in 1967's "Reflections in a Golden Eye"; Clift even went to Germany to make the dreadful spy thriller "The Defector" to prove he was healthy enough to work. But unfortunately, Clift died in 1966 at the age of 45 before production began on "Golden Eye." Marlon Brando took over the role.<br>
<br>
During their marriage, Taylor and Burton made a lot of dreck that wasn't worth anyone's talents. But they did make an incredible team in several of their earlier films -- 1962's "Cleopatra," the &#252;ber-epic in which they met and fell in love; the 1966 classic "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?," for which Liz won her second lead actress Oscar, and the spirited 1967 version of Shakespeare's comedy "The Taming of the Shrew."
lat-pairings5_fctsdsgy20080206140519

( Archive Photos )

Elizabeth Taylor and Montgomery Clift; Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton

Taylor and Clift are not only breathtakingly beautiful in their first film together as the ill-fated lovers in the 1951 classic "A Place in the Sun," their loves scenes -- especially their first kiss -- will still make your knees tremble. The two teamed up six years later in the long Civil War epic, "Raintree County," for which Taylor received her first lead actress Oscar nomination. Clift, though, suffered severe facial injuries in a car crash while the film was in production that changed his appearance and affected his performance. In 1959, they teamed up for the final time in the Tennessee Williams' surreal excursion into madness, "Suddenly, Last Summer." But Clift, who was battling booze and other demons, is difficult to watch. Taylor wanted him to star with her in 1967's "Reflections in a Golden Eye"; Clift even went to Germany to make the dreadful spy thriller "The Defector" to prove he was healthy enough to work. But unfortunately, Clift died in 1966 at the age of 45 before production began on "Golden Eye." Marlon Brando took over the role.

During their marriage, Taylor and Burton made a lot of dreck that wasn't worth anyone's talents. But they did make an incredible team in several of their earlier films -- 1962's "Cleopatra," the über-epic in which they met and fell in love; the 1966 classic "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?," for which Liz won her second lead actress Oscar, and the spirited 1967 version of Shakespeare's comedy "The Taming of the Shrew."

  • Email E-mail
  • add to Twitter Twitter
  • add to Facebook Facebook
  • Home Delivery Home Delivery

PHOTO GALLERIES

TOP VIDEO

CONNECT WITH US


2013 YEAR IN REVIEW
Look for this special section in your
Baltimore Sun newspaper on Dec. 29, 2013.
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Instagram
  • Google Plus
  • RSS Feeds
  • Mobile Alerts and Apps

Contact Us | Newsroom directory | Social Sun