Palos Verdes Peninsula

A scenic sunset belies the fact that 200 feet underwater off the Palos Verdes Peninsula lies one of the most hazardous spots in the U.S. In 1996 the EPA declared about 17 square miles of ocean a Superfund site, ranking it among the most hazardous places in the country. Montrose Chemical Corp., which was based near Torrance, had released 110 tons of DDT and 10 tons of toxic PCBs into the sewers from 1947 through 1971. The chemicals then flowed into the Pacific.
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( Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times / July 28, 2008 )

A scenic sunset belies the fact that 200 feet underwater off the Palos Verdes Peninsula lies one of the most hazardous spots in the U.S. In 1996 the EPA declared about 17 square miles of ocean a Superfund site, ranking it among the most hazardous places in the country. Montrose Chemical Corp., which was based near Torrance, had released 110 tons of DDT and 10 tons of toxic PCBs into the sewers from 1947 through 1971. The chemicals then flowed into the Pacific.

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