'In the Mood for Love'

Granted, Wong Kar-wai’s romantic film "In the Mood for Love" doesn't directly offer a style icon. But this stunning paean to a traditional dress -- specifically, an elegant Chinese cheongsam -- shows the power of adopting a uniform and embracing austerity. (Just imagine wearing that beloved outfit that makes you seek out your reflection on elevator doors every single day.)<br>
<br>
Actress Maggie Cheung as a mostly abandoned wife in Hong Kong in 1962, wafts from scene to scene in deliciously colorful variations of a figure-hugging cheongsam with its regal mandarin collar and dainty cap sleeves. "That dress. The style was so coherent," says the Costume Institute's  Andrew Bolton.<br>
<br>
Tellingly, the film's art director and costumer William Chang tallied his personal wardrobe in 2006 as T-shirts, four pairs of jeans, four jackets and two pairs of shoes.<br>
<br>
<b>More in Image</b>:<br>
&#149; <a href="http://www.latimes.com/features/lifestyle/la-ig-filmintro21-2008dec21,0,5655769.story" rel="nofollow">10 classic style movies</a> | <a href="http://www.latimes.com/features/lifestyle/la-ig-movies21-2008dec21-pg,0,7227450.photogallery" rel="nofollow">Photos</a><br />
&#149; <a href="http://www.latimes.com/features/lifestyle/la-igw-filmclothes-pg,0,3415253.photogallery" rel="nofollow">Scene Stealers: Movie costumes that started fashion trends</a><br />
&#149; <a href="http://www.latimes.com/features/lifestyle/la-igw-filmlists21-2008dec21-pg,0,7935769.photogallery" rel="nofollow">Style films that packed a punch? Insiders' favorites</a><br />
&#149; <a href="http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/alltherage/2008/12/style-that-left.html">Your turn: Share your favorites on our blog</a><br />
lat-ig_movies7_g7dis9ke20081217162748

( USA Films )

Granted, Wong Kar-wai’s romantic film "In the Mood for Love" doesn't directly offer a style icon. But this stunning paean to a traditional dress -- specifically, an elegant Chinese cheongsam -- shows the power of adopting a uniform and embracing austerity. (Just imagine wearing that beloved outfit that makes you seek out your reflection on elevator doors every single day.)

Actress Maggie Cheung as a mostly abandoned wife in Hong Kong in 1962, wafts from scene to scene in deliciously colorful variations of a figure-hugging cheongsam with its regal mandarin collar and dainty cap sleeves. "That dress. The style was so coherent," says the Costume Institute's Andrew Bolton.

Tellingly, the film's art director and costumer William Chang tallied his personal wardrobe in 2006 as T-shirts, four pairs of jeans, four jackets and two pairs of shoes.

More in Image:
10 classic style movies | Photos
Scene Stealers: Movie costumes that started fashion trends
Style films that packed a punch? Insiders' favorites
Your turn: Share your favorites on our blog

  • Email E-mail
  • add to Twitter Twitter
  • add to Facebook Facebook
  • Home Delivery Home Delivery

PHOTO GALLERIES

TOP VIDEO

CONNECT WITH US


2013 YEAR IN REVIEW
Look for this special section in your
Baltimore Sun newspaper on Dec. 29, 2013.
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Instagram
  • Google Plus
  • RSS Feeds
  • Mobile Alerts and Apps

Contact Us | Newsroom directory | Social Sun