Edward Barber and Jay Osgerby

In 2004, the two designers were commissioned to design furniture for the newly restored 1935 De La Warr Pavillion, the first widely acclaimed modernist building in Britain. Replacing the original chairs created by the Finnish designer Alvar Aalto was a tall order. "The modernist, rectilinear volumes of the building demanded a sculptural solution," they write. "We observed that many chars, particularly dining chairs are viewed from the rear, positioned against a table. It was this fact which led to development of the rear skid leg, the purpose of which was to create an enclosed volume. ... The holes in chair seat and back reduce the weight of the chair and help to increase the structural integrity." The chair was painted an orange-red in reference to the original color of Aalto's wooden chairs.
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( David Brook )

In 2004, the two designers were commissioned to design furniture for the newly restored 1935 De La Warr Pavillion, the first widely acclaimed modernist building in Britain. Replacing the original chairs created by the Finnish designer Alvar Aalto was a tall order. "The modernist, rectilinear volumes of the building demanded a sculptural solution," they write. "We observed that many chars, particularly dining chairs are viewed from the rear, positioned against a table. It was this fact which led to development of the rear skid leg, the purpose of which was to create an enclosed volume. ... The holes in chair seat and back reduce the weight of the chair and help to increase the structural integrity." The chair was painted an orange-red in reference to the original color of Aalto's wooden chairs.

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