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Universal Pictures relocating international theatrical operations to L.A.

MoviesTelevision IndustryNBCUniversalFederal Communications CommissionComcast Corporation

Universal Pictures is further streamlining its international structure by relocating the head of its international theatrical operations unit to Los Angeles, the company said Tuesday.

David Kosse, president of international for Universal and a longtime resident of London, will remain there and vacate his post. Kosse could have another role at Universal Pictures.

Universal, which is headquartered in Universal City and is a unit of NBCUniversal, is launching a search for a successor. Kosse will continue to oversee the group during the transition period.

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The studio changed another management structure in recent months -- moving the head of its home entertainment division from London to Los Angeles. 

In February, Universal said Eddie Cunningham, then president of Universal Pictures International Entertainment, would move to L.A. and become president of worldwide home entertainment.

Both moves are seen as a way to better manage the company's international business. The relocation of the head of international theatrical operations would allow the studio's marketing and distribution divisions to work more closely together, and with executives who are based in Universal City.

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Jeff Shell, the chairman of Universal Filmed Entertainment Group, was based in London before relocating to Los Angeles last year to assume his newly-created position atop the studio's film business.

He has spent the previous two years in London, overseeing NBCUniversal's international television businesses. Given Shell's overseas expertise, The Times reported in September the appointment of Shell partly reflected the growing importance of the foreign film market.

Universal's London offices will remain open. 

NBCUniversal is owned by cable giant Comcast Corp.

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