1932 | 'Scarface'

After the brutal violence in the pre-Code 1930 gangster film "Little Caesar" and 1931's "The Public Enemy," director Howard Hawks upped the body quotient in this vivid drama. But this time censors in various governmental bodies clamped down on the film. A new ending was filmed and the subtitle "The Shame of a Nation" was added to let audiences know the film was meant to condemn, not glorify, gangsters. (Brian De Palma's 1983 remake with Al Pacino also was criticized for its use of over-the-top violence.)
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( Universal Studios )

After the brutal violence in the pre-Code 1930 gangster film "Little Caesar" and 1931's "The Public Enemy," director Howard Hawks upped the body quotient in this vivid drama. But this time censors in various governmental bodies clamped down on the film. A new ending was filmed and the subtitle "The Shame of a Nation" was added to let audiences know the film was meant to condemn, not glorify, gangsters. (Brian De Palma's 1983 remake with Al Pacino also was criticized for its use of over-the-top violence.)

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