Caddyshack

<b>'Caddyshack'</b><br>
<br>
You’ll never look at a Baby Ruth candy bar in quite the same way, thanks to this 1980 classic that throws taste out the window. Harold Ramis made his feature directorial debut with this crackup starring Michael O’Keefe as a caddy at an upscale country club filled with wackos including a stern jurist (Ted Knight), the free-spirited son (Chevy Chase) of the club’s co-founder, the eccentric groundskeeper (Bill Murray) who is obsessed with ridding the greens of a pesky gopher, and a lowbrow real estate tycoon (Rodney Dangerfield).<br>
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The Baby-Ruth-in-the-swimming-pool gag is based on a real incident that occurred at the high school of co-writer and star Brian Doyle-Murray. The infamous gopher was created by special effects legend John Dykstra.<br>
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Eight years ago, “Caddyshack” scored No. 71 on the American Film Institute’s list of the 100 funniest American films. The film, though, was poorly received when it opened. In fact, co-writer Douglas Kenney was supposedly so upset at the critics' response that he went into a drug-influenced depression. A month after the film’s release, his body was found in Hawaii at the base of a cliff.<br>
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Blush-ometer: 2.5 out of 5
la-caddyshackgopher-photo

( Warner Bros. )

'Caddyshack'

You’ll never look at a Baby Ruth candy bar in quite the same way, thanks to this 1980 classic that throws taste out the window. Harold Ramis made his feature directorial debut with this crackup starring Michael O’Keefe as a caddy at an upscale country club filled with wackos including a stern jurist (Ted Knight), the free-spirited son (Chevy Chase) of the club’s co-founder, the eccentric groundskeeper (Bill Murray) who is obsessed with ridding the greens of a pesky gopher, and a lowbrow real estate tycoon (Rodney Dangerfield).

The Baby-Ruth-in-the-swimming-pool gag is based on a real incident that occurred at the high school of co-writer and star Brian Doyle-Murray. The infamous gopher was created by special effects legend John Dykstra.

Eight years ago, “Caddyshack” scored No. 71 on the American Film Institute’s list of the 100 funniest American films. The film, though, was poorly received when it opened. In fact, co-writer Douglas Kenney was supposedly so upset at the critics' response that he went into a drug-influenced depression. A month after the film’s release, his body was found in Hawaii at the base of a cliff.

Blush-ometer: 2.5 out of 5

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