Plank Replacement

Chris Taylor, a shipwright at the Henry B. duPont Preservation Shipyard, guides one of the original ceiling planks from the hold of the Charles W. Morgan, the last remaining wooden whaling ship in the world and the "crown jewel" of the Mystic Seaport collection. The 40-foot plank, which lines the inside of the hull covering the ship's frames, has not seen daylight since it was installed in 1841. The ship is undergoing a meticulous three-year, $6 million restoration at the shipyard. A hole was cut into the hull to allow the shipwrights to remove the old, rotted planks, which will be replaced by authentic replacement planks.
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( STEPHEN DUNN / HARTFORD COURANT / September 18, 2009 )

Chris Taylor, a shipwright at the Henry B. duPont Preservation Shipyard, guides one of the original ceiling planks from the hold of the Charles W. Morgan, the last remaining wooden whaling ship in the world and the "crown jewel" of the Mystic Seaport collection. The 40-foot plank, which lines the inside of the hull covering the ship's frames, has not seen daylight since it was installed in 1841. The ship is undergoing a meticulous three-year, $6 million restoration at the shipyard. A hole was cut into the hull to allow the shipwrights to remove the old, rotted planks, which will be replaced by authentic replacement planks.

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