Colorectal cancer screening pays off

Touting the success of <a class="taxInlineTagLink" id="HEDAI0000020" title="Colon Cancer" href="/topic/health/diseases-illnesses/colon-cancer-HEDAI0000020.topic">colorectal cancer</a> screening, the <a class="taxInlineTagLink" id="ORGOV000011" title="U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention" href="/topic/health/diseases-illnesses/u.s.-centers-for-disease-control-prevention-ORGOV000011.topic">Centers for Disease Control and Prevention</a> announced that the disease's prevalence and <a class="taxInlineTagLink" id="14023000" title="Death" href="/topic/health/death-14023000.topic">death</a> rate have fallen. The disease killed 16.7 people per 100,000 in 2007 -- compared to 19 people per 100,000 in 2003. But, the agency noted, screenings are beginning to level off -- even with 53,000 people dying from the disease annually. (Pictured: Candace Henley, a survivor of colon cancer, who has become an advocate for colon cancer testing.)
hk-colorectal-cancer-screening2-photo

( Alex Garcia / Chicago Tribune )

Touting the success of colorectal cancer screening, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced that the disease's prevalence and death rate have fallen. The disease killed 16.7 people per 100,000 in 2007 -- compared to 19 people per 100,000 in 2003. But, the agency noted, screenings are beginning to level off -- even with 53,000 people dying from the disease annually. (Pictured: Candace Henley, a survivor of colon cancer, who has become an advocate for colon cancer testing.)

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