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Health Care

191,000 get insurance on state exchange

Maryland health exchange officials told the Senate Finance Committee of the General Assembly Wednesday that 191,000 people had signed up for public and private insurance during open enrollment, which lasts until Feb. 15.

Maryland Medicine and Science

more medicine & science
  • Salt concentrations high in 2 Md. rivers
    Salt concentrations high in 2 Md. rivers

    Salting roads and sidewalks may keep people safe in winter, but scientists warn that profligate de-icing is turning urban streams and rivers salty, harming many fish and other fresh-water aquatic creatures.

  • Study: Climate change raises risks of power outages
    Study: Climate change raises risks of power outages

    With flooding already on the rise along the East Coast, a new study led by the Johns Hopkins University suggests that urban dwellers may have more to worry about from climate change than just getting their feet wet if they live near the water. People in some inland cities who think they're safe...

  • Supermoon eclipse, meteor showers on 2015 skywatching calendar
    Supermoon eclipse, meteor showers on 2015 skywatching calendar

    The highlight of 2015 for skywatchers could be the coincidence of a "supermoon" and a late-night full lunar eclipse in September. Otherwise, there are plenty of chances to see distant planets and shooting stars.

  • Hopkins scientists find way to extend mission to Mercury
    Hopkins scientists find way to extend mission to Mercury

    A mission to Mercury already years past its original expiration date is getting one more month of bonus time to observe the solar system's innermost planet.

  • Record competition for stem cell grants means tough choices for state officials
    Record competition for stem cell grants means tough choices for state officials

    The competition for Maryland's stem cell research grants will be stiffer than ever as applications flood in next month, forcing officials to be more selective even as scientists worry that the state's fiscal problems and a new administration in Annapolis may mean smaller budgets in the future.

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