American Cancer Society awards $3.84 million to local researchers

Maryland researchers were awarded $3.84 million to study cancer.

The American Cancer Society has handed out $3.84 million in grants to Maryland cancer researchers at the University of Maryland, Johns Hopkins University and the National Cancer Institute for a range of investigations.

The largest grant of nearly $1.67 million went to Cheryl L. Holt, from the University of Maryland, College Park’s department of behavioral and community health, to look at health disparities in a project titled “Integration of Cancer Health Activities into African American Churches.” She is also co-director of the population science program at Maryland's Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Comprehensive Cancer Center in Baltimore.

Most begin July 1 and are multi-year awards.

Other grants were: $163, 500 to Sarah R. Amend in the Hopkins’ Brady Urology Institute for “Lethal Disseminated Tumor Cells in Prostate Cancer Patients”; $792,000 to Anthony K Leung in the Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health’s department of biochemistry and molecular biology for “Increase microRNA Activities by Inhibiting poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerases”; $300,000 to Dr. Nancy Schoenborn in the Hopkins school of medicine for “Patient Preferences and Prognosis to Inform Individualized Cancer Screening”; $163,500 to Anthony Tubbs from the National Cancer Institute’s experimental immunology branch for “Mechanisms and Therapeutic Potential of Tissue-specific DNA Damage Response”; and $758,000 to Dr. Graeme F. Woodworth from the University of Maryland, Baltimore’s department of neurosurgery for “Fn14-targeted Biodegradable BCNU Nanoparticles for Invasive Brain Cancer.”

According to the society, about half of all men and a third of all women across the country will develop cancer during their lifetimes. About 1.5 million new cases are diagnosed a year. Cancer is the second leading cause of death behind heart disease.

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