Moms try and cope with nagging for unhealthy food

When children see cartoons and other targeted advertising for unhealthy foods they tend to nag their parents for it.
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Given the growing <a class="taxInlineTagLink" id="HEDAI0000057" title="Obesity (INACTIVE)" href="/topic/health/obesity-%28inactive%29-HEDAI0000057.topic">obesity</a> epidemic, some researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health decided to examine this “nag factor” and how mothers were coping.
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The results, published in the August issue of the Journal of Children and Media, found 64 mothers of children ages 3 to 5 listed three categories of nagging: juvenile nagging, nagging to test boundaries and manipulative nagging.<P>
Read more <a href="http://weblogs.baltimoresun.com/health/2011/08/moms_try_and_cope_with_nagging.html" target=new>here.</a>

( Matt Roth, Patuxent Publishing / November 15, 2005 )

When children see cartoons and other targeted advertising for unhealthy foods they tend to nag their parents for it.

Given the growing obesity epidemic, some researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health decided to examine this “nag factor” and how mothers were coping.

The results, published in the August issue of the Journal of Children and Media, found 64 mothers of children ages 3 to 5 listed three categories of nagging: juvenile nagging, nagging to test boundaries and manipulative nagging.

Read more here.

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