Baltimore biotech parks are thriving

Dr. Marco Chacon stands in the protein chemistry lab of Paragon Bioservices at the University of Maryland BioPark in West Baltimore, for which he is planning to do more hiring.<P>
While some sectors of <a class="taxInlineTagLink" id="PLGEO100100600000000" title="Maryland" href="/topic/us/maryland-PLGEO100100600000000.topic">Maryland</a>'s economy struggle to shake free of the Great Recession, the biotechnology parks adjacent to Baltimore's two top teaching hospitals stubbornly continue to add laboratories, offices and - most importantly for the city - jobs.<br>
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The gains have been both large and small, and not always along the path or at the pace envisioned when the parks were created. But the growth is unmistakable, fueled by the critical mass of expertise, resources and discoveries at both the Johns Hopkins and <a class="taxInlineTagLink" id="OREDU0000156" title="University of Maryland, College Park" href="/topic/education/colleges-universities/university-of-maryland-college-park-OREDU0000156.topic">University of Maryland</a>, Baltimore medical campuses.Among the most recent arrivals is Frank Diehl, chief scientific officer at Inostics, a German company seeking to perfect a new diagnostic tool for cancer patients. He hopes to have a small lab running next year on the city's east side, at the Science + Technology Park at Johns Hopkins.

( Algerina Perna, Baltimore Sun / November 24, 2010 )

Dr. Marco Chacon stands in the protein chemistry lab of Paragon Bioservices at the University of Maryland BioPark in West Baltimore, for which he is planning to do more hiring.

While some sectors of Maryland's economy struggle to shake free of the Great Recession, the biotechnology parks adjacent to Baltimore's two top teaching hospitals stubbornly continue to add laboratories, offices and - most importantly for the city - jobs.

The gains have been both large and small, and not always along the path or at the pace envisioned when the parks were created. But the growth is unmistakable, fueled by the critical mass of expertise, resources and discoveries at both the Johns Hopkins and University of Maryland, Baltimore medical campuses.Among the most recent arrivals is Frank Diehl, chief scientific officer at Inostics, a German company seeking to perfect a new diagnostic tool for cancer patients. He hopes to have a small lab running next year on the city's east side, at the Science + Technology Park at Johns Hopkins.

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