Where are they now: National champion 2001-02 Maryland men's basketball team

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  • Jobs in Health

    Jobs in Health

    Learn about the wide variety of careers in the health-care field in the words of local professionals. Also see the latest hirings and promotions at Health Professionals on the Move.

  • Ask the expert

    Ask the Expert

    Health professionals in Maryland answer questions related to their field.

  • Coverage: 'Death with Dignity' debate

    Coverage: 'Death with Dignity' debate

    Follow our coverage of the issue and its ongoing controversy.

  • Collateral Damage

    Collateral Damage

    For more than a year, Baltimore Sun reporter Andrea K. McDaniels and photographer Lloyd Fox have examined the unseen impact of violence — on children, caregivers and victims’ relatives — in the Baltimore area. McDaniels wrote the articles while participating in The California Endowment Health Journalism...

  • Sun Investigates: Group Homes

    Sun Investigates: Group Homes

    A two-month investigation by The Baltimore Sun highlighted troubles at a LifeLine Inc. group home for disabled foster children, where a 10-year-old died in July. The Sun showed that state regulators were left in the dark about significant problems at LifeLine, including the founder’s conviction...

  • Sun coverage: Ebola in the news

    Sun coverage: Ebola in the news

    Read Baltimore Sun coverage of the 2014 world-wide Ebola outbreak.

  • When it comes to heart attacks, women are different from men

    When it comes to heart attacks, women are different from men

    On that November Sunday in 2015, Stephanie Thomas Nichols was 40 miles into her drive home to Townsend, Delaware, from her vacation cabin in Western Maryland when she felt an odd sensation in her upper body. "No pain, just pressure, heaviness,'' recalls Nichols, who owns a software company. She...

  • U.S. life expectancy may rise to over 80 by 2030

    U.S. life expectancy may rise to over 80 by 2030

    By 2030, American women will live an average of more than 83 years, while men may reach an average of 80, a new study estimates. These figures are up just slightly from current 2010 estimates. Right now, American women live to an average of 81, while men live to an average of 77. But other developed...

  • Does mercury in fish play a role in ALS?

    Does mercury in fish play a role in ALS?

    Eating mercury-laden seafood may raise the risk of developing ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis), preliminary research suggests. The report warns of possible harm from fish containing the most mercury, such as swordfish and shark. It doesn't suggest a higher risk of ALS from general consumption...

  • Hopkins researchers suggest Baltimore offer addicts safe places to do drugs

    Hopkins researchers suggest Baltimore offer addicts safe places to do drugs

    Researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health recommend that Baltimore turn to an unorthodox way of dealing with its heroin epidemic by opening two facilities that provide people a safe place to do drugs. In a report published and commissioned by the nonprofit Abell Foundation,...

  • Hopkins Bloomberg study: Parents not keeping opioids away from children, teenagers

    Hopkins Bloomberg study: Parents not keeping opioids away from children, teenagers

    Parents are leaving their opioid prescriptions out in the open, on counters and dressers, inadvertently giving children, especially teenagers, easy access to the pills, according to researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. The researchers surveyed 681 adults who use the...

  • HIV cases down in Maryland, U.S.

    HIV cases down in Maryland, U.S.

    HIV infections in the United States have fallen for several years, and few places have seen a bigger drop than Maryland, according to new estimates from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Cases in the state dropped an average of 7.5 percent per year from 2008 to 2014. That was...

  • Number of Maryland babies born with drugs in their system growing

    Number of Maryland babies born with drugs in their system growing

    Amanda Ashley's baby daughter trembled uncontrollably. Her scream rang through the intensive care unit — high-pitched and shrill. She was so agitated no amount of rocking or cuddling could soothe her. Her baby was suffering from symptoms of buprenorphine withdrawal, and Ashley — who had used heroin...

  • When things become too much: How to help a hoarder

    When things become too much: How to help a hoarder

    When Bec and Lee Shuer were dating, she thought all of the stuff crammed into Lee's house belonged to him and his roommates. When they later moved into a studio apartment together in Massachusetts, she realized all of that stuff was Lee's. Overflowing boxes, stacks of albums and games — the seemingly...

  • After twin tragedies, man gets face transplant at Mayo Clinic

    After twin tragedies, man gets face transplant at Mayo Clinic

    He'd been waiting for this day, and when his doctor handed him the mirror, Andy Sandness stared at his image and absorbed the enormity of the moment: He had a new face, one that had belonged to another man. His father and his brother, joined by several doctors and nurses at Mayo Clinic, watched...

  • U.S. flu vaccine a good match; season moderate so far

    U.S. flu vaccine a good match; season moderate so far

    This season's flu vaccine seems to be working pretty well, weakening the punch of a nasty bug that's going around, U.S. health officials said Thursday. Preliminary figures suggest the vaccine is 48 percent effective. That's not bad since the strain that's making most people sick is one of the worst....

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