Ed Pesanti, Avon

<img height="225" hspace="5" width="400" align="left" src="http://www.trbimg.com/img-5308eb77/turbine/hc-itowns-cover0119-fv" />
Ed Pesanti of <a class="taxInlineTagLink" id="PLGEO100100202010000" title="Avon (Hartford, Connecticut)" href="/topic/us/connecticut/hartford-county/avon-%28hartford-connecticut%29-PLGEO100100202010000.topic">Avon</a> is a professor at the <a class="taxInlineTagLink" id="HNPO10" title="University of Connecticut Health Center" href="/topic/health/healthcare/university-of-connecticut-health-center-HNPO10.topic">University of Connecticut Health Center</a> in the Infectious Diseases division of the Department of Medicine. Originally from Montana, he came to UCHC in 1982. He has had no formal art training.<br>
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"I carved little figures when I was young and carved a couple of kachina dolls when I worked on the Navajo reservation in the 1970s. I took it up again about 15 years ago, first using cottonwood driftwood , then bass wood, then butternut and, currently, Honduras mahogany.<br>
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"Most of my pieces have a face or two in them. I have recently begun inlaying turquoise to provide some color and most of my recent pieces have such inlays. I work on a piece about 2 hours a day. The larger ones take me about 3 months to carve and an additional 2-3 months to smooth and finish."
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Ed Pesanti of Avon is a professor at the University of Connecticut Health Center in the Infectious Diseases division of the Department of Medicine. Originally from Montana, he came to UCHC in 1982. He has had no formal art training.

"I carved little figures when I was young and carved a couple of kachina dolls when I worked on the Navajo reservation in the 1970s. I took it up again about 15 years ago, first using cottonwood driftwood , then bass wood, then butternut and, currently, Honduras mahogany.

"Most of my pieces have a face or two in them. I have recently begun inlaying turquoise to provide some color and most of my recent pieces have such inlays. I work on a piece about 2 hours a day. The larger ones take me about 3 months to carve and an additional 2-3 months to smooth and finish."

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