Paula Deen's disclosure that she has type 2 Diabetes has triggered some harsh reactions. For years, Deen has featured high-calorie Southern foods in her cookbooks and on television. Some  folks are riled by the fact that that she was doing it while aware of her own diabetes, a disease that has been linked to a poor diets and excess weight. And they poked at Deen for aligning her new webste with Victoza, a diabetes medicine made by Novo Nordisk.


Fellow celebrity chef Anthony Bourdain -- who has famously called Deen "the most dangerous person in America" -- issued a veiled tweet that did not mention her name, but was taken by many to refer to her. It said: "Thinking of getting into the leg-breaking business, so I can profitably sell crutches later."

The Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, which had labeled "Paula Deen’s Southern Cooking Bible" among most unhealthful of 2011, weighed in (so to speak) as well. In an open letter to Deen, dietitian Susan Levin invited her "to participate in our 21-Day Vegan Kickstart, an online program that has assisted more than 150,000 people in trying a diet that fights diabetes."

For Deen, I don't know which is worse: Bourdain's wrath or a vegan diet.