Michelle Newby Lancaster

Michelle Newby Lancaster didn't like "Manuscript Found in Accra" by Paulo Coelho because she felt it was the literary equivalent of "live, laugh, love." (Michelle Newby Lancaster photo)

Who I am

Michelle Newby Lancaster from Colorado City, Texas.

One unique thing about me

I don't remember how I first fell in love with books. My mother read to me from birth, and I've always read voraciously, usually two books a week, sometimes three. I do remember being conscious, at the age of 8, of the idea that I could enter another world and/or another skin through books. To date I've found no concept more exciting than that.


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I liked

"The Unfinished Work of Elizabeth D." by Nichole Bernier, "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee, "Paris Requiem" by Lisa Appignanesi, "Love in the Time of Cholera" by Gabriel Garcia Marquez and "Flight Behavior" by Barbara Kingsolver. I loved "The Unfinished Work of Elizabeth D." because I identified so strongly with the central struggles of the two female protagonists: societal expectations of motherhood and gender roles. Also, the sentences were often exquisite — so beautiful!

I didn't like

"Manuscript Found in Accra" by Paulo Coelho. I felt this book was the literary equivalent of "live, laugh, love."

Author I'd like to meet

I would most like to meet Charles Bowden and talk about how Mexico can break your heart. I would also ask whether he thinks things are improving there or if the fact that we get less news is a result of the intimidation of Mexican journalists or short American attention spans.

Up next

"Revolt" by Qaisra Shahraz, "The Whitehall Mandarin" by Edward Wilson, "Bittersweet" by Miranda Beverly-Whittemore and "The Opposite of Maybe" by Maddie Dawson.

Tell us about your reading life at printersrow@tribune.com.