Hopscotch crosswalk, designed by Graham Coreil-Allen

Hopscotch crosswalk, designed by Graham Coreil-Allen (Photo courtesy of Baltimore Office of Promotion and the Arts / December 2, 2013)

Crosswalks, unless you happen to be on Abbey Road, tend to be boring. 

Until last week, the most exciting thing you'll see in a Baltimore crosswalk is an occasional Toynbee tile.

But now the folks at the Baltimore Office of Promotion and the Arts are livening up crosswalks near the historic Bromo Seltzer Arts Tower in the city's newest arts and entertainment district.

Baltimore artist Graham Coreil-Allen designed a hopscotch court in a crosswalk at Eutaw and Lombard streets that was unveiled today.

Coreil-Allen, who creates art in public places, also created an installation in Waverly called Tinges Commons and, earlier this fall, led tours of "invisible sites and overlooked architectural and psychic features" in Station North.

The hopscotch court is one of four art works that will eventually grace crosswalks near the century-old tower, which contains artist studios that are open to the public on weekends.

Artist Paul Bertholet created a crosswalk at Fayette and Eutaw streets which looks like a giant zipper opening. 

And two other artistic crosswalks are planned in the area in an effort to draw people to the city's Westside Arts and Entertainment District, according to a news release from the Baltimore Office of Promotion and the Arts.