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After cicada, firefly's warm glow grows

We cherish the firefly a little more this year. The luminescent insects have always had good timing. They arrive in mid-June to tell us that school is over and summer is here. They bring warm nights and long days. They give license to run through the grass barefoot and jump at the sky.  Read more ...

Cicada farewell

As the cicada season winds down, we bid farewell not just to Brood X but also to our loyal Buzz correspondents. Many thanks for your sometimes weird, occasionally icky but mostly delightful submissions. We'll end the Cicada Chronicles of 2004 poetically -- and since we hate goodbyes, we'll end with not one but two poems.  Read more ...

Root, root, root for the cicada team

Overheard after a recent Towson Recreation Association softball game, chanted by the Blue Devils to their opponents, the Tar Heels:  Read more ...

Insects spark pupils' interest

With the verve of a motivational speaker, 12-year-old Rodrick Johnson stood beside his decorated science board explaining its purpose. But for the seventh-grader with the rapid-fire delivery, the science presentation crossed subject lines to incorporate creative writing, geography and math.  Read more ...

Capitalizing on cicadas

In a few weeks, the buzz will be over. No more Janis Joplinesque shrieks from the trees of Baltimore. The cicadas will be gone.  Read more ...

Hear Cicadaville on Buffett radio

Tom Ponton doesn't like being called a parrothead, as fans of Jimmy Buffett are known, because it makes him sound like someone who dresses like a cheeseburger - in paradise, get it? - for the singer's concerts.  Read more ...

Cicadas' arrival triggers weighty talks with kids

When the periodical cicadas emerged from the ground and began their march across Stoneleigh lawns and paths, Sarah Rhea and her 19-month-old daughter, Ellie, were forced into an early confrontation about life and death.  Read more ...

The Buzz

Medicine & Science

The Fear Factor

Yamile Garcia was helping a friend pack up her Essex apartment last week when she spotted something that made her skin go cold: the blood-red eyes of a 17-year cicada.  Read more ...

Shins seem to sing of cicadas

It appears that a band from Albuquerque, N.M. - a distinctly cicada-free zone - has unwittingly written the perfect anthem to this buzzy season. The band is the Shins, known for shimmering, melodic pop songs, and the song is "Those to Come" from the album Chutes Too Narrow.  Read more ...

Cicada song is illegally loud

Huh? You said what about the 17-year cicadas?  Read more ...

The Buzz

Bugs drop curtain on school play

A correspondent writes:  Read more ...

Taste

Bug bites

The cicadas are here. While some folks are reaching for protective netting and headgear, tennis rackets and fly swatters, others are readying the saute pan and skillet.  Read more ...

Crunch time: Crisp critters prove hard to swallow

THE KEY TO enjoying cooked cicadas -- if that is possible -- is to eat them with your eyes closed.  Read more ...

'Cicada cash' rumor squashed

The buzz began last week, when word spread that Johns Hopkins University was paying $100 -- or maybe even $1,000 -- for rare blue-eyed cicadas.  Read more ...

The buzz

The next time you meet a cicada, remember that the poor guy has been living underground for 17 years. Point out, though, that even as much has changed since its egg was deposited in 1987, much has stayed the same. Consider:  Read more ...

Md. cicada invasion gets off to quiet start

The season of the cicada has arrived.  Read more ...

Cicada Q&A

EDITOR'S NOTE: Because of the overwhelming number of inquiries from baltimoresun.com readers, The Sun's Frank Roylance has joined Michael Stroh in answering your questions about cicadas.  Read more ...

Medicine & Science

Mathematicians explore cicada's mysterious link with primes

It's probably no surprise that periodical cicadas like the clan invading Maryland this month are a big draw for biologists. Less obvious is why someone like Glenn Webb would care.  Read more ...

And thus, we begin the Cicada Chronicles of 2004

Fear the cicada? Or embrace these winged wonders that appear just once every 17 years?  Read more ...

Movies to drive you a little buggy

For a little bug that becomes a national obsession every 17 years, the cicada hasn't left much of an impression on America's movie screens.  Read more ...

Cicada love: a young boy and his bugs

Any day now, hordes of cicadas will emerge from 17 years underground to begin their noisy mating ritual.  Read more ...

Ick! 'Looks like a bumper crop'

They're gross. They're loud. They're bumbling.  Read more ...

Here cicada, there cicada, everywhere cicada cicada

YOU PEOPLE who haven't seen these things, you have no idea what you're in for.  Read more ...

Schools brace for the sounds of spring

Bryn Mawr School officials are taking to heart a warning from a former headmistress about the possible perils of holding graduation outdoors next spring on the wooded, 26-acre North Baltimore campus.  Read more ...

Medicine & Science

Nature's noisemakers

One summer several years ago, Gaye Williams was walking in a wooded spot near Fort Meade as millions of cicadas whirred and droned in the trees overhead. Then the weirdest thing happened: She was seized with the impulse to flee.  Read more ...

From Sun archive: 1987

So long, cicada, don't bug us again till 2004

Their song is waning. Their sex drive is dwindling. They're dropping dead one by one.  Read more ...

From Sun archive: 1987

Cicada Cuisine

Give up cursing those cicadas. Cook them instead. Eating them is the best revenge.  Read more ...

From Sun archive: 1987

Make mine medium rare

I am a man of simple tastes, and so I prefer my cicadas without fanfare -- lightly sauteed in butter and garlic, then served on a bed of romaine lettuce along with a glass of white wine, a loaf of French bread and a tossed salad.  Read more ...

From Sun archive: 1987

There is nothing nice to be said about cicadas

Regular visitors to this space may recall a column a few weeks ago in which many charitable things were said about cicadas.  Read more ...

From Sun archive: 1987

Sex invades the treetops

The "song" of the 17-year cicada has crescendoed to the proportions of a "din," or at least a "racket" in Central Maryland; cats and dogs are snacking on them like potato chips and their discarded shells and rotting bodies are piling up.  Read more ...

From Sun archive: 1987

'Do they get in the car?

As a public service to readers, we asked Gaye Williams, a scientist at the state agriculture department who specializes in insect studies a few questions about cicadas posed by students at Fallstaff Middle School.  Read more ...

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