www.baltimoresun.com/explore/howard/publications/howard-magazine/bs-exho-bowenwork-balances-the-body-20120910,0,1172596.story

baltimoresun.com

Bowenwork balances the body

By L'Oreal Thompson

9:01 PM EDT, September 10, 2012

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You’ve probably heard of Swedish, hot stone and deep tissue massages, but at Mason & Friends Salon & Spa in Columbia, clients are receiving a different kind of massage therapy that claims to help the body repair itself.

“Bowenwork helps the body remember how to heal,” says Wendy Seiler, a practitioner at Mason & Friends.

Developed in the 1950s by an Australian osteopath, Bowenwork seeks to balance tension patterns in the body. During a  session, the practitioner places his or her fingers or thumbs over precise points on muscles, tendons or other soft structures. A gentle rolling pressure is then applied to the underlying tissue, according to Seiler.

“The rolling creates vibrations that send a message to the brain and stimulate your body’s ability to heal itself,” she explains.

Bowenwork is appropriate for everyone from babies to the elderly and recommended for anybody experiencing pain. It also can support the treatment of high or low blood pressure, stress reactions, arthritic pain, insomnia, depression, stroke recovery and developmental delay.

Between three and five sessions scheduled one week apart are recommended for most sports injuries, work-related injuries and other problems, according to Seiler. The sessions typically last between 30 and 60 minutes and cost $71 each, after an initial $95 session that can last up to one and a half hours.

“You will mostly feel really, really relaxed in a very deep way that allows changes to occur in the body,” says Seiler. “Bowenwork lowers anxiety and gives you freedom from pain and freedom of movement.”

Mason & Friends Salon & Spa, 6770 Oak Hall Lane, Columbia, 410-381-2440, www.masonhair.com