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The Baltimore Sun

On Sept. 12, all seemed right with the world in West Friendship

My beloved father, who is 93 years of age, always admonishes his family with these parting words. "Peace and Harmony."

I was reminded of Dad's words on the afternoon of Sept. 12 when a cloudless blue sky and perfectly temperate atmosphere finished out a day of great peace and harmony in our little village of West Friendship. Homes in the community displayed gracefully waving flags, our delightful postmistress Shirley Barber regaled customers with a black and purple ensemble in honor of the Ravens win over the Pittsburgh Steelers the day before. Even Shirley's nails were done up in Ravens colors.

The Burgess family's annual late summer picnic tents were a reminder to all that summer was coming to a close. The Young family's patriarch, out at Jenny's Market, waxed enthusiastically about the perfection of late ripening peaches.

School busses shuttled children home from school in what was the first week of classes without a disturbance from Mother Nature. Homeowners seized the afternoon's perfection to hop on their varied John Deere's in late summer efforts to tidy the landscape.

Most everyone had power restored, even those pioneers like the Larkin and Bates families who survived eight days without water and electric. On this September day, in West Friendship, all seemed right with the world.

Donna Shroff has spent the last few weeks huddled over her sewing machine. Shroff, an active community volunteer, has not only solicited sponsors for the 10th annual Children's Miracle Network golf outing, but handsewn a golf design quilt to be raffled as part of the fundraiser. The proceeds from this Realty Executives event Friday, Sept. 23 at Hampshire Greens Golf Course, in Silver Spring, will benefit Children's National Medical Center of Washington

The volunteers of West Friendship's Station 3 remind the community that with school in session, it is the time to watch out for those kids and buses.

I'll second that. I sure wish I could mention that in person to the individual who passed me on Rosemary Lane the other day. This speed demon chose to pass me in a no-pass zone on a winding country residential lane which happens to be home to many residences with young children as well as some senior citizens who enjoy taking afternoon strolls.

If leaves are beginning to fall then that's a sure sign that the hard working folks at West Friendship's Antique Farm Machinery Club are busy getting ready for the annual fall Consignment Sale and Auction and Farm Heritage Days. John and Virginia Frank and all the members of the club have been busy preparing all month.

The club members long active in all things rural in West Friendship, are readying for the 16th annual Howard County Farm Heritage Days. The three day celebration of West Friendship's rural roots, is set for Friday through Sunday, Sept. 23-25, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The celebration will be held at the Howard County Living Farm Heritage Museum in West Friendship.

Located on Route 144, just across from the Howard County Fairgrounds, the museum and grounds are really taking shape. Thanks to the hard work of the Howard County Antique Farm Machinery Club membership, the museum is becoming the reality that club president John Frank and fellow club members have dreamed of.

Virginia Frank hopes the community will stop by to see the amazing changes that have been made at the museum. The family celebration will be held rain or shine and will include vintage farm equipment demonstrations, wagon rides, food, arts and crafts, a blacksmith exhibit and old time threshing demonstrations.

Part of the three-day tribute to all things rural, is the club's annual consignment sale and auction. The sale, which boasts antiques, farm machines and tools, will be held Saturday, Sept. 24 at 10 a.m. at the Living Farm Heritage Museum, 12985 Frederick Road.

Art Boone and John Frank will play with their respective bluegrass bands, Southwest Bluegrass and Lone Mountain on Saturday and on Sunday. A bake sale, flea market, a country auction and tours of the museum are on the bill of fare. Questions about the Farm Heritage Days? Go to the club website http://www.farmheritage.org.

Organizers say, "Walk ins are welcome!" Just a reminder that a Red Cross Blood Drive will be held Sept. 29 from 2 to 9 p.m. at St. James United Methodist Church, 12470 Old Frederick Road .Questions? Call the church office at 410-442-2020 to schedule a donation time.

The popular Apple Butter Market flea market and farm market continues Sunday, Sept. 25, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., at the South Branch Park, West Friendship Road off of Route 32 at the end of Main Street in Sykesville. Vendors include farm market purveyors, craft artisans, sellers of vintage flea market finds, food treat stands and Aw Boy fries.

All proceeds from the Apple Butter Market sales go toward the renovation of the historic Apple Warehouse on the premises. At this writing Ivy Wells was happily accepting vendor applications for this market day or for the last of the season which is set for Oct. 31.

To register as a vendor, go to http://www.sykesville.net/dapple about the flea market? Call the Town of Sykesville office at 410-795-8959.

A reminder from the gang at As You Like It Hair Salon. Last year during their second ever "Cut-a-Thon" to benefit Climb for Hope, an organization which holds as its mission finding a viable treatment for cancer, Kara and Betsy Ford, owners of As You Like It Hair Salon, in Glenelg, raised more than $2,000. This year, the third annual benefit Cut-a-Thon is set for Oct. 9 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and the dynamic Betsy and Kara hope to raise even more.

Door prizes, free samples, fruit smoothies from Icelandic yogurt and fabulous hair styles manicures, seated massage and more are on the agenda when the Ford's open the doors of their salon for the Climb for Hope event.

Don't wait to make an appointment as the news is spreading fast. All proceeds from the fund raiser will go directly to Climb for Hope and aid in the research of treatment for breast cancer. Call the salon and ask for Betsy or Kara by dialing 410-442-2077 or go to the website at http://www.asyoulikeithair.com.

Fall is upon us and so is the upcoming roster of St. Andrew's Episcopal Church monthly Thursday night suppers. It's chicken pot pie and all the trimmings Thursday, Sept. 22, 6-8 p.m. when the feast donated by Smokin' Hot Catering of Glenwood will be held at 2892 Route 97, in Glenwood.

Dine in or carry out. Organizers will post balloons to guide the way to the church, which is between the Glenwood Post Office and Union Chapel Road. Cost is $9 per person or $30 per family. Proceeds from the September dinner will fund a teen pilgrimage. In addition to the dinner, organizers at St. Andrew's are also preparing for the annual mum and pumpkin sale which will be held Saturday, Sept. 24, 10 a.m.-1 p.m., and Sunday, Sept. 25, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Chrysanthemums, pumpkins, ornamental flowering kale plants, pansies, decorative fall gourds and even popping corn will be on sale.

Greenbridge Pottery of Dayton will host "September Saturdays" this fall with an opportunity for visitors to watch the potters of Greenbridge while they work. Visit the studio, place holiday orders and watch while mugs, pots and plates are made before your eyes. Greenbridge Pottery's fall Saturday hours are 1 to 4 p.m. The gallery is at 5159 Greenbridge Road, in Dayton. Call 410-531-5920 with questions or go to the website at http://www.greenbridgepottery.com.

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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