Ever wonder why bow hunting is such an enjoyable sport? For me it was a quiet time to spend in the woods, a time to enjoy nature at its best. In addition to the possible shot at a deer, there is so much to see and learn.

I always liked to get into my stand at least a half hour before day light. This gives me time to get settled and quiet. During this period of time I like to listen to the sounds of the forest and the story it is telling.

For instance, the cracking of leaves as an old raccoon heads for its daily resting place. The voices of birds as they start their day in search of food and the sound of falling nuts as the squirrels prepare for winter.

All of natures little animals can be seen either gathering food or trying to avoid becoming food for something larger. If you are lucky you may catch sight of a red fox or a fat groundhog on the prowl.


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So far no deer, but we wait and watch. This is what I call thinking time. A time to work out any thing that is troubling me or something I have to do.

Finally you see a deer. It is well out of range so you may try to lure it in with the use of a grunt call. Sometimes this works and as we now, any time working with wildlife, sometimes it doesn't.

Has this been a successful day? In my book it has. It has been a day of rest, a day of peace and look forward to the next time I can be as one with the woods.

As archery season approaches please be extra careful with tree stands. Most accidents during this season are caused by faulty or badly installed stands.

Most important, enjoy the hunt and nature. The taking of game will come in time.