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Letter: Remember this when you vote

ElectionsBritainGeorge Washington

Dear Editor:

As we approach the November elections, it is very clear that there is a stark contrast in the vision, principles, and philosophy of the two major parties. Both clearly have major differences in the direction they wish to take our country and they are seeking to persuade voters that their way is the best way for our future.

The party that has the best way is the party under which our liberties will remain secure and not diminish or be totally lost. Our nation was birthed as a result of King George's violating Great Britain's constitution in reference to the American colonies. Our battle with Britain was in self-defense and over the loss of our liberties which were violated by the king. Those violations included the economic issue of excessive taxation as well as the larger issue of liberty. America found herself in the position of "taxation without representation." It was the erosion of liberty through taxation that led Patrick Henry to so eloquently cry out, :...give me liberty or give me death." John Dickson, a leader in the War for Independence, wrote, "Those who are taxed without their consent...are slaves." George Washington and the Britain was seeking to "...fix the shackles of slavery upon us.."

Behind the rhetoric that we hear so loudly at this time of year from the political landscape, there is the effort to convince the hearers that one particular viewpoint is better than another. Whether the subject is the economy, health care, budget, or taxes, that viewpoint should, in the spirit of the Founders, articulate liberty for the American people. Therefore, as we prepare to vote, may I encourage you to go to the polls with the knowledge that you should choose the candidates who best represent what this country was founded upon—the endowment by their Creator of "Life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness."

And let us fulfill the trust spoken of by our first president when he so passionately spoke in his first inaugural address in 1789 that, "The preservation of the sacred fire of liberty, and the destiny of the republican model of government, are justly considered deeply, perhaps as finally, staked on the experiment entrusted to the hands of the American people."

Jeff Berg

Forest Hill

Copyright © 2014, The Baltimore Sun
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