Become a digitalPLUS subscriber. 99¢ for 4 weeks.

25 years ago: Illegal gaming machines seized, 40 drug dealers arrested

Drug TraffickingRestaurantsDining and DrinkingRestaurant and Catering IndustryHalloween

From The Aegis dated Oct. 29, 1987:

It was a big week for law enforcement in Harford County 25 years ago, when more than 25 illegal video poker machines were seized and 40 drug dealers were arrested during separate raids.

The first was the video poker game raid, done early on a Monday morning. Maryland State Police seized 26 "slot machines" from 11 establishments, mostly American Legions and VFWs. No one was arrested as the eight-month investigation concluded, but charges were pending. The Maryland Court of Appeals had recently ruled that such machines were an form of illegal gambling.

"We will have these raids until we run out of storage space or they run out of machines. But we have a lot of storage space, so I guess they'll run out of machines," Harford County State's Attorney Joe Cassilly said.

In a separate operation later that evening, 40 alleged marijuana and cocaine dealers were arrested in a raid "designed to hamper drug activity" in the county.

While some were considered "big-time dealers," the deals with undercover officers involved relatively small amounts of drugs, mostly between a quarter gram and a half-gram of cocaine, which sold for $25 and $50, respectively.

The arrests came primarily in Aberdeen and Havre de Grace, where, according to The Aegis, "such suspects have been known to be more elusive."

"What we're excited about is the fact that we got 40 dealers off of the street. And it's going to be pretty hard to buy drugs, illegally drugs, in Harford County starting tomorrow," Maj. Jesse Bane, a spokesman for the Harford County Sheriff's Office, which conducted the eight-month investigation, said.

Without even looking at the names submitted, Gov. William Donald Schaefer rejected the list of possible appointments to the Harford County Circuit Court vacancy.

The governor said he wanted a list of at least three names, if not more, by mid-November, a couple weeks before Judge Brodnax Cameron was set to retire.

The Judicial Nominating Commission had submitted two names to the governor, though they remained confidential, which were rejected. The commission had interviewed 18 county lawyers interested in the position. All of them, including the two whose names were forwarded, would have to apply again.

A few days before Halloween, a local icon was pictured on the front page with two ginormous pumpkins. According to the cutline, "Mary Rigdon, of Cooptown, is a tradition in the Jarrettsville area, having sold produce and Halloween decorations for years at her stand on Jarrettsville Road."

Inside, a picture showed a farewell message as a local business changed hands. The caption for a picture of the Hickory Inn Restaurant, The Fireside, with the message "Thanks for the memories," read "The family of Conrad Brieger Jr., owners of the Hickory Inn on U.S. Rt. 1 North of Bel Air since 1958, left a farewell message to patrons and friends on the restaurant's marquee, after the business was sold to Kit Ying Lee and Wei Zuo Kuang. Chinese food will be added to the menu while the restaurant reopens after renovations are completed."

Harford Mall was hosting a children's Halloween party in the afternoon, before trick-or-treating, 25 years ago this week, with a cupcake walk and a costume parade and judging for various age groups. "Treats for all your favorite little spooks and goblins," read the ad. Tollgate Mall was also having a party in the evening with a costume contest, a pumpkin contest and a visit from Casberry the Clown.

And if anyone needed some Halloween suggestions, all they needed to do was look at the front of the "Focus on Food/Brides" section 25 years ago this week, which provided recipes for a spicy pumpkin sheet cake, pumpkin-orange butter, curried pumpkin soup, pumpkin pinwheels, pumpkin biscuits, Libby's famous pumpkin pie and harvest punch.

Copyright © 2014, The Baltimore Sun
Related Content
Drug TraffickingRestaurantsDining and DrinkingRestaurant and Catering IndustryHalloween
Comments
Loading